“An artist's only concern is to shoot for some kind of perfection, and on his own terms, not anyone else's”: Franny and Zooey; Inscribed by J.D. Salinger

  • Franny and Zooey.
  • Franny and Zooey.
  • Franny and Zooey.
  • Franny and Zooey.

Franny and Zooey.

$9,200.00

Item Number: 88131

New York: Little, Brown, and Company, 1961.

First edition, second printing of Salinger’s third book. Octavo, original cloth. Inscribed by Salinger on the front free endpaper to a personal friend, “Oke, Stop over sometime, JDS 8/26/61.” While Salinger was known for his reclusive behavior with regard to the spotlight of the international press, he did have close relations with the local townspeople around his New Hampshire home, who respected his privacy. This inscription shows the authentic nature of those relationships. Affixed to the verso of the front panel and front free endpaper are three newspaper clippings regarding Salinger’s reputation as a recluse later in life, including a clipped article from the Boston Herald, Thursday, April 25th, 1991, “Salinger breaks silence to refuse award” regarding Salinger’s refusal to accept a Lillian L. Poses Creative Arts Award in 1991 and a clipped Q. & A. regarding news of a fire at Salinger’s hilltop home in Cornish, New Hampshire. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. Books signed by Salinger are scarce.

Salinger's short story Franny and novella Zooey first appeared in The New Yorker in 1955 and 1957 respectively. Both stories center on the two youngest members of the Glass family of New York's Upper East Side, Franny takes place in an unnamed college town during Franny's weekend visit to her boyfriend. Set shortly after Franny, Zooey takes place in the Glass family Manhattan apartment where Franny is suffering from an existential breakdown. Both stories echo Salinger's own disillusionment with the inauthenticity he saw in contemporary society, which he himself attempted to escape through an ever-evolving roster of unconventional religious practices.

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