"My dear Andre, Thank you so much for your letter of December 31, I am certainly inserting a passage at once in Volume III to cover the important point you mention. I am obliged to you for drawing my attention to it": Letter Signed by Winston S. Churchill to Andre de Staercke, a contributing editor to his war memoirs

  • Winston S. Churchill Autograph Letter Signed.

Winston S. Churchill Autograph Letter Signed.

$4,500.00

Item Number: 101977

One page typed letter signed by Winston S. Churchill, dated 22 January 1950, on his “28 Hyde Park Gate, London” letterhead stationery. The letter is written to Andre de Staercke, a contributing editor to his war memoirs, regarding the upcoming release of the third volume. With a handwritten opening and closing. Churchill writes in part, “My dear Andre, Thank you so much for your letter of December 31, I am certainly inserting a passage at once in Volume III to cover the important point you mention. I am obliged to you for drawing my attention to it. Please convey my thanks to His Royal Highness for his kind message. My thoughts are so often with him in these very strained and difficult times for him and for Belgium. As you will have seen I have had to curtail my stay in Madeira in view of the General Election here. Polling Day has been fixed for February 25 and so you can imagine we shall be much occupied for the coming weeks. We all send you our good wishes for a very happy New Year. your friend, Winston S. Churchill.” At the time this letter was written, Belgium was gearing up for a national referendum on the question of whether to allow King Leopold III to return from exile in Switzerland. Churchill himself faced an important national election, in which he won (though his party did not), remaining Leader of the Opposition. In 1951, he was again elected Prime Minister.  In near fine condition. Double matted and framed with a portrait of Churchill. The entire piece measures 21 inches by 12.75 inches.

In July of 1917, Prime Minister David Lloyd George appointed Churchill Minister of Munitions. In this position, Churchill made a commitment to increase munitions production, streamlined the organisation of the department, and soon negotiated an end to a strike in munitions factories along the Clyde. He made repeated trips to France, visiting the Front and meeting with French political leaders, including its Prime Minister, Georges Clemenceau. After the war, in 1919 Lloyd George moved Churchill to the War Office as both Secretary of State for War and Secretary of State for Air.

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