"I hope that this book ain't so silly and that it will always remain in the cas[s]a": First Edition of Where the Sidewalk Ends, Signed by Shel Silverstein; Inscribed to the Children of His Editor

  • Where the Sidewalk Ends: Poems and Drawings.
  • Where the Sidewalk Ends: Poems and Drawings.
  • Where the Sidewalk Ends: Poems and Drawings.
  • Where the Sidewalk Ends: Poems and Drawings.
  • Where the Sidewalk Ends: Poems and Drawings.

Where the Sidewalk Ends: Poems and Drawings.

$15,000.00

Item Number: 91344

New York: Harper & Row, Publishers, 1974.

First edition of the author’s first collection of children’s poetry. Stated first edition on the copyright page. Small quarto, original brown cloth, illustrated. Association copy, inscribed by Shel Silverstein with an original poem on the front free endpapers to the children of his editor and publicist William Cole, “For Alex and Rossa and Billy, I hope that this book ain’t so silly and that it will always remain in the cas[s]a (The superfluous ‘s’ has been scribbled out with footnote “Bill Cole’s Incessant Editorial Meddling”) of Billy and Alex Rossa (Not a bad rhyme for three such difficult names and if you don’t read Spanish, Learn it!) Love, Shel Silverstein.” American editor and anthologist William Rossa Cole edited over 50 anthologies of verse for children and adults throughout his career which included tenures at Knopf, Simon & Schuster and Viking, where he had his own imprint. He is thanked by Silverstein at the end of Where the Sidewalk Ends “for his continued encouragement” and many of Silverstein’s poems made their first appearance at Cole’s solicitation. Near fine in a very good dust jacket. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. An exceptional association copy.

"The poems, ranging from serious to silly, from philosophical to ridiculous, allow the reader or listener— the rhyme and rhythm of these nonsensical poems make them perfect for reading aloud— to discover Silverstein’s greatest gift: his ability to understand the fears and wishes and silliness of children" (Silvey, 602).

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