"A man, a real man, must never be an agent, a tool, or a gambler — acting for himself or for others — he must employ such. A real man — a financier — is never a tool. He used tools. He created. He led": First Editions of Each Novel in the Author’s Acclaimed Trilogy of Desire; From the library of Wallace Stegner

  • The Trilogy of Desire: The Financier, The Titan, and The Stoic.
  • The Trilogy of Desire: The Financier, The Titan, and The Stoic.
  • The Trilogy of Desire: The Financier, The Titan, and The Stoic.
  • The Trilogy of Desire: The Financier, The Titan, and The Stoic.

The Trilogy of Desire: The Financier, The Titan, and The Stoic.

$1,800.00

Item Number: 89562

New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1912-1947.

First editions of each novel in the author’s acclaimed Trilogy of Desire, from the library of American novelist Wallace Stegner, with his signature to the front free endpaper of The Financier. Often referred to as “The Dean of Western Writers”, Wallace Stegner taught at both Harvard and Stanford University where he founded the creative writing program; his students included Sandra Day O’Connor, Robert Stone, Ken Kesey, and Larry McMurtry. Stegner’s novel Angle of Repose won him the 1972 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction; and in 1977 he was awarded the National Book Award for The Spectator Bird. Octavo, 3 volumes. In near fine condition. An exceptional association linking two highly influential 20th century American novelists.

The Trilogy of Desire is the acclaimed series of novels about the mogul Frank Cowperwood, a businessman based on the real-life streetcar tycoon Charles Yerkes. In the first novel, Frank Cowperwood, whose father is a banker, makes his first money by buying cheap soaps on the market and selling them back with profit to a grocer. Later, he gets a job in Henry Waterman & Company, and leaves it for Tighe & Company. He also marries an affluent widow, in spite of his young age. Over the years, he starts misusing municipal funds with the aid of the City Treasurer. In the second novel, already rich, Cowperwood moves to Chicago with his new wife Aileen. He decides to take over the street-railway system. He bankrupts several opponents with the help of John J. McKenty and other political allies. In the Stoic, the conclusion to the trilogy, and already a respected Tycoon, he decides to move to London, England, where he intends to take over and develop the underground railway system.

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