Rare First editions of Robert Barker's 1602 Printings of the Book of Common Prayer, Old, and New Testaments; elaborately bound

  • The Book of Common Prayer, with the Psalter or Pslams of David, The Bible: Translated according to the Ebrew and Greeke, and The New Testament of our Lord Jesus Christ conferred diligently with the Greeke.
  • The Book of Common Prayer, with the Psalter or Pslams of David, The Bible: Translated according to the Ebrew and Greeke, and The New Testament of our Lord Jesus Christ conferred diligently with the Greeke.
  • The Book of Common Prayer, with the Psalter or Pslams of David, The Bible: Translated according to the Ebrew and Greeke, and The New Testament of our Lord Jesus Christ conferred diligently with the Greeke.
  • The Book of Common Prayer, with the Psalter or Pslams of David, The Bible: Translated according to the Ebrew and Greeke, and The New Testament of our Lord Jesus Christ conferred diligently with the Greeke.

The Book of Common Prayer, with the Psalter or Pslams of David, The Bible: Translated according to the Ebrew and Greeke, and The New Testament of our Lord Jesus Christ conferred diligently with the Greeke.

$2,500.00

Item Number: 88147

London: Robert Barker, Printer to the Queenes most excellent Majesty, 1602.

Early 17th century versions of the English Book of Common Prayer and The Old and New Testaments printed by Robert Barker. Octavo, elaborate gilt tooling to the front and rear panels, raised bands, marbled endpapers, hand tooling to the page edges. Title page of the Booke of Common Prayer printed with elaborate red and black woodcut frames. Title pages of the Old and New Testament printed with elaborate black and white woodcut frames with portraits of the holy saints. In very good condition with some professional restoration to a few pages. An exceptional example.

Most notably the printer of the King James Bible, one of the most influential books ever printed in the English language, Robert Barker was a printer to James I of England and the son of Christopher Barker, printer to Queen Elizabeth I. Barker inherited his father's printing house in London in 1599 upon his father's death and printed mostly works of an official nature including books of prayer and scripture. In 1631, Barker collaborated with fellow royal printer Martin Lucas on a word-for-word reprint of the King James Bible which would later become known as The Wicked Bible due to the accidental omittance of the word "not" in the sentence: "Thou shalt not commit adultery." The majority of copies of the Wicked Bible were immediately cancelled and burned; Barker was fined the equivalence of over 33,000 pounds and was deprived of his printer's license.

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