First Edition of Reports of the Committee of Investigation: Sent in 1873 by the Mexican Government to the Frontier of Texas; From the Library of Ulysses S. Grant

  • Reports of the Committee of Investigation: Sent in 1873 by the Mexican Government to the Frontier of Texas.
  • Reports of the Committee of Investigation: Sent in 1873 by the Mexican Government to the Frontier of Texas.
  • Reports of the Committee of Investigation: Sent in 1873 by the Mexican Government to the Frontier of Texas.
  • Reports of the Committee of Investigation: Sent in 1873 by the Mexican Government to the Frontier of Texas.
  • Reports of the Committee of Investigation: Sent in 1873 by the Mexican Government to the Frontier of Texas.
  • Reports of the Committee of Investigation: Sent in 1873 by the Mexican Government to the Frontier of Texas.

Reports of the Committee of Investigation: Sent in 1873 by the Mexican Government to the Frontier of Texas.

$8,800.00

Item Number: 94712

New York: Baker & Godwin, 1875.

First edition of the first English translation of the 1873 Mexican Border Commission’s investigative report on Texan allegations of Mexican robberies at the international border. From the library of Ulysses S. Grant, presented to him by Mexican Secretary of Foreign Affairs Ignacio Mariscal with a dedication card affixed to the second free endpaper. Octavo, original cloth with gilt titles and tooling to the spine, with three large hand-colored folding maps at rear. In very good condition. Housed in a custom half morocco and chemise clamshell box. Rare and highly desirable from the library of President Grant.

In 1873, the Mexican Border Commission conducted an investigation into claims by Texan citizens against Mexican citizens, stating multiple instances of theft of property and livestock. The present volume is the first English translation of the Mexican Government's findings which asserts these claims to be false and the origins of the dispute to be the encouragement of Native American plundering on both sides of the border. It was during the earlier 1846 Mexican-American War that Ulysses S. Grant established himself as a competent soldier and established the commendable record that set him on the tract for military leadership.

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