"I who ere while the happy garden sung, by one man's disobedience lost, now sung Recover'd Paradise to all mankind": John Milton's Paradise Regain'd. A Poem in Four Books To which is added Samson Agonistes

  • Paradise Regain’d. A Poem in Four Books To which is added Samson Agonistes: and Poems upon Several Occasions.
  • Paradise Regain'd. A Poem in Four Books To which is added Samson Agonistes: and Poems upon Several Occasions.
  • Paradise Regain'd. A Poem in Four Books To which is added Samson Agonistes: and Poems upon Several Occasions.
  • Paradise Regain'd. A Poem in Four Books To which is added Samson Agonistes: and Poems upon Several Occasions.

Paradise Regain’d. A Poem in Four Books To which is added Samson Agonistes: and Poems upon Several Occasions.

$375.00

Item Number: 95906

Birmingham: Printed by John Baskerville for J. and R. Tonson, 1759.

Early example of Milton’s work on the the temptation of Christ as recounted in the Gospel of Luke. Quarto, bound in contemporary tree calf, gilt titles to the spine, gilt ruled dentelles, marbled endpapers, all edges gilt. In very good condition.

Whereas Milton's Paradise Lost is ornate in style and decorative in its verse, Paradise Regained is carried out in a fairly plain style. Specifically, Milton reduces his use of simile and deploys a simpler syntax in Paradise Regained than he does in Paradise Lost, and this is consistent with Jesus's sublime plainness in his life and teachings (in the epic, he prefers Hebrew psalms to Greek poetry). As implied by its title, Milton sets out to reverse the "loss" of Paradise. Thus, antonyms are often found next to each other, reinforcing the idea that everything that was lost in the first epic will be regained by the end of this "brief epic".

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