Rare First Edition of Robert Tilney's My Life in the Army, Three Years and a Half With the Fifth; Signed by Him Army Corps, Army of the Potomac 1862-1865

  • My Life in the Army, Three Years and a Half With the Fifth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac 1862-1865.
  • My Life in the Army, Three Years and a Half With the Fifth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac 1862-1865.
  • My Life in the Army, Three Years and a Half With the Fifth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac 1862-1865.
  • My Life in the Army, Three Years and a Half With the Fifth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac 1862-1865.

My Life in the Army, Three Years and a Half With the Fifth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac 1862-1865.

$750.00

Item Number: 43575

Philadelphia: Ferris & Leach , 1912.

First edition of this Civil War memoir by a soldier and clerk in the Fifth Army Corps. Octavo, original cloth, frontispiece. Signed by the author on the front free endpaper, “Compliments of Robert Tilney.” In near fine condition. Rare and desirable signed.

Robert Tilney witnessed the campaigns and battles as a private soldier in the line and as a headquarters clerk at division and Corps level. The participated in the campaigns on the Peninsula, at Harrison’s Landing, Chickahominy, on the Rappahannock, at Fredericksburg, at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, back on the Rappahannock, in the Wilderness and Spotsylvania, at North Anna, on the Chickahominy again, before Petersburg, on the Weldon Railroad, at Hatcher’s Run, at Appomattox, back to Washington, and at camp at Four Mile Run. From January 862, until the close of the Chancellorsville Campaign, he served with his regiment as a private. After that he served shortly as company and regimental clerk which brought him to the notice of the Ordinance Officer of the brigade who had him detailed as his clerk. Tilney served under him for a few months, going with him to the division headquarters to which he was transferred. An officer in his regiment having been appointed Provost-Marshal of the Corps, had him detailed to duty as his clerk and he served with hi until the summer of 1864, when he was appointed chief clerk in the officer of the Assistant Adjutant General of the Corps. Up to March of that year he was to depend mainly on his memory for the events related, but at that time he began writing a large number of letters to a friend in Philadelphia; these came subsequently in his possession, and for two months, this record is a condensation of the matter contained in the letters of that period. Beginning with the active campaigning in may, he continue the letters in diary form until his return to with the army to the vicinity of Washington at the close of the war.

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