“The reasonable man adapts himself to the world: the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself": George Bernard Shaw's Man and Superman; Lengthily Inscribed by Him

  • Man and Superman.
  • Man and Superman.

Man and Superman.

$2,000.00

Item Number: 101650

New York: Brentano's, 1922.

Early printing of the Nobel Prize-winning playwright’s classic work. Octavo, original cloth, paper spine label. Presentation copy, lengthily inscribed by the author on the half-title page with a humorous inscription, “To Mr. S.D. Green, a gentleman entirely unknown to me, and for whose desires I cannot make myself in any way responsible, I inscribe this copy of Man & Superman at his own quite inexcusable request G. Bernard Shaw 15th May 1924.” The recipient, S.D. Green was a 1904 graduate and colleague of Franklin Delano Roosevelt at Harvard University. He later taught at the historic Trenton High School in Trenton, New Jersey and amassed an important library of books signed by American Presidents and important early 20th century novelists. In very good condition with some wear to the spine label and crown of the spine.  

George Bernard Shaw began writing Man and Superman in 1901 and determined to write a play that would encapsulate the new century's intellectual inheritance. Shaw drew not only on Byron's verse satire, but also on Shakespeare, the Victorian comedy fashionable in his early life, and from authors from Conan Doyle to Kipling. In this powerful drama of ideas, Shaw explores the role of the artist, the function of women in society, and his theory of Creative Evolution. As Stanley Weintraub says in his new introduction, this is "the first great twentieth-century English play" and remains a classic exposé of the eternal struggle between the sexes. Man and Superman was the first drama to be broadcast on the BBC's Third Programme on October 1st, 1946. To celebrate Radio 3's 50th anniversary, the play was directed by Sir Peter Hall,

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