"Well, it ain't no use to sit and wonder why, babe Even you don't know by now And it ain't no use to sit and wonder why, babe It'll never do somehow": Original LP Signed by Bob Dylan and Pete Seeger

  • Hootenanny Special: Featuring Bob Dylan and Pete Seeger.
  • Hootenanny Special: Featuring Bob Dylan and Pete Seeger.

Hootenanny Special: Featuring Bob Dylan and Pete Seeger.

$6,800.00

Item Number: 62095

1965.

Original stereo LP put out by Zenith featuring various folk singers, including Bob Dylan and Pete Seeger. Signed by both Bob Dylan and Pete Seeger in contemporary signatures on the front panel of the record sleeve. It features Dylan singing: Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right and House of the Rising Sun; Pete Seeger singing, John Henry and Follow the Drinkin’ Gourd; New Christy Minstrels Californi-o and Rovin’ Gambler; Brothers Four San Francisco Bay Blues and Michael; Village Stompers If I Had a Hammer and Reilly’s Daughter. Matted and framed. The entire piece measures 20 inches by 25.5 inches. Contemporary signatures on an original record are rare.

For many listeners in the early 1960s Dylan embodied the ideals of the folk revival: a young hobo, drifting out of the West, singing old songs he had learned in his travels and writing new songs about the trials, troubles, and tribulations of the world around him. He wrote songs about everything that came into his mind--love songs, outlaw ballads, rhymed comic monologues, ragtime novelties, blues--but for a lot of people, what mattered most were his songs of social consciousness. He was hailed as the voice of a generation, and the pressure to live up to that description increasingly felt like a burden. Meanwhile, folk music was changing from a secret music shared by devoted fans into a mass-market commodity with number one hits, pop singers jumping on the bandwagon, and a national TV show called Hootenanny--which was named after Pete Seeger's singalong gatherings.

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