"We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit": The Works of Aristotle; Finely Bound

  • Aristotle’s Politics and Economics; Treatise on Rhetoric; Nicomachean Ethics; Organon, or Logical Treatises.
  • Aristotle's Politics and Economics; Treatise on Rhetoric; Nicomachean Ethics; Organon, or Logical Treatises.
  • Aristotle's Politics and Economics; Treatise on Rhetoric; Nicomachean Ethics; Organon, or Logical Treatises.
  • Aristotle's Politics and Economics; Treatise on Rhetoric; Nicomachean Ethics; Organon, or Logical Treatises.
  • Aristotle's Politics and Economics; Treatise on Rhetoric; Nicomachean Ethics; Organon, or Logical Treatises.

Aristotle’s Politics and Economics; Treatise on Rhetoric; Nicomachean Ethics; Organon, or Logical Treatises.

$2,500.00

Item Number: 98364

London: Henry G. Bohn, 1853.

The works of Aristotle, finely bound. Octavo, 5 volumes. Bound in full leather, frontispiece of Aristotle to Politics and Economics, gilt titles and tooling to the spine, gilt ruled to the front and rear panels, marbled endpapers and edges. In near fine condition. Translated by Octavius Freire Owen, Theodore Buckley, R.W. Browne, Edward Walford. With an analysis by Thomas Hobbes. Finely bound sets of Aristotle are uncommon.

Aristotle's philosophical works covered an incredibly broad range of subjects including physics, biology, zoology, metaphysics, logic, ethics, rhetoric, politics and government; constituting the first comprehensive system of Western Philosophy. Through these many branches, Aristotle sought the universal; his aim was to discover the essential nature of being, becoming, existence and reality which he believed could be achieved through detailed systems of logic and classification. Aristotle’s works on natural history, particularly observations of the sea-life visible from the island of Lesbos, are some of the earliest known to have survived and include one of the earliest classification systems. Aristotle’s Metaphysics is considered to be his principal work as well as the first major work in metaphysical philosophy itself. “It forms the highest step in Aristotle’s system, and deals with the first principles of all existence. Here he grapples with the deepest questions of philosophy” (Peck, 130).

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