Presidents and World Leaders

Showing 609–624 of 647 results

  • “Governments don't produce economic growth people do”: First Edition of the 40th President of the United States Autobiography An American Life; Signed by Ronald Reagan, George Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev

    REAGAN, Ronald [George Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev].

    An American Life.

    New York: Simon & Schuster 1990.

    First edition of the 40th President of the United States’ memoir. Octavo, original half cloth, illustrated. Signed and dated by the author on the half-title page, “Ronald Reagan Oct. 9- 92” and additionally signed by George H.W. Bush, Vice President in the Reagan Administration and later President and Mikhail Gorbachev, Russian counterpart to Reagan. “When it came to communism, socialism and other systems that denied people their basic human rights, President Reagan was tough as nails. A devoted anti-communist, he was not afraid to say what needed to be said or do what needed to be done to bring freedom to people who were living under repressive regimes. In that regard, of all the foreign policy achievements of the Reagan Presidency, none is more important, or had more lasting impact on the world, than the fundamental change in U.S.-Soviet relations. It was not due to luck or accident. Speaking of U.S.-Soviet relations and his steadfast determination to reduce arms, President Reagan would often say: “We don’t mistrust each other because we’re armed; we’re armed because we mistrust each other.” He believed that if the mistrust was eliminated, then so, too, could the dangerous, destabilizing weapons. President Reagan was confident that if he could just get his Soviet counterpart in a room and tell him face-to-face that America had no hostile intent, the mistrust would begin to evaporate. Instinctively he knew that could not be accomplished through the traditional diplomacy of a bureaucratic State Department. So, to the horror of some long-time career government employees, he did what no President had ever done. While recovering from the assassination attempt in 1981, he handwrote a letter to Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev in reply to Brezhnev’s rather belligerent letter sent less than six weeks after President Reagan’s assumption of office. In his reply, President Reagan sought to find common ground and to establish a better tone to relations between the White House and the Kremlin. But as things turned out, the President would have to be patient. Brezhnev died in November 1982, and was replaced by Yuri Andropov. Less than 2 years later, Andropov died, and was succeeded by Constantin Chernenko. Incredibly, Chernenko died just 13 months later. To replace him, the Soviet high command chose a younger leader, Mikhail Gorbachev. It was Gorbachev with whom President Reagan would finally have that long-sought opportunity to begin to form a new relationship, one that would lead to a lessening of tensions between Washington and Moscow, and eventually to meaningful arms reduction. The first of their five meetings was on “neutral turf.” It took place in Geneva, Switzerland in November 1985. In a small plain boat house just down a stone path from Fleur D’Eau, the grand chateau where their formal sessions took place, President Reagan and General Secretary Gorbachev sat down in two comfortable chairs in front of a roaring fireplace, and with only interpreters present, began to forge a relationship that would not only improve U.S.-Soviet relations, but would turn out to be the beginning of the end of Soviet domination of Eastern Europe and ultimately, of the Soviet Union itself. Almost a year later, the two leaders got together again, this time in Reykjavik, Iceland. In a summit meeting not long in the making, they met at Hofdi House, a picturesque waterfront structure that was once the French consulate. There they came tantalizingly close to an agreement to eliminate all medium-range missiles based in Europe. But at the last minute, Gorbachev insisted that the United States abandon plans for a space-based missile defense system. Despite President Reagan’s offer to share the system’s technology with the Soviet Union so that both countries could be protected, Gorbachev dug in his heels and would not budge. The last thing Ronald Reagan would ever do would be to risk America’s safety for the sake of an agreement. The Summit was over. The anger and sadness was etched in President Reagan’s face as he emerged from Hofdi House. There was chatter that this was the end of the Reagan-Gorbachev relationship, and that there would be no more Summits. But President Reagan knew better. Partly because of his natural optimism, and partly because he believed that Gorbachev shared his desire to make the world safer, he was certain that eventually talks would resume. The President directed his team to keep the dialogue going and to see whether the progress made in Reykjavik could be the basis for successful negotiations going forward. That’s exactly what happened.It is a noteworthy measure of the confidence President Reagan had in the strength of his relationship with Gorbachev that just 8 months after Reykjavik, he boldly called on him to tear down the Berlin Wall. Just as he expected, in December, 1987, President and Mrs. Reagan welcomed the Gorbachevs to Washington for the third Summit. This time, the mood was upbeat and even celebratory. In a glittering East Room ceremony on December 8th, the two leaders signed the historic INF Treaty, eliminating all nuclear-armed ground-launched ballistic and cruise missiles with ranges between 500 and 5,000 kilometers. For the first time ever, the amount of nuclear arms was actually being reduced rather than merely limited. In the Spring of 1988 the Reagans traveled to Moscow for Summit #4. From a historical perspective, the highlight of that trip was the Kremlin ceremony at which President Reagan and General Secretary Gorbachev signed the now-ratified INF Treaty, but the Reagans also found time to enjoy some cultural treats including the Bolshoi Ballet and a visit to a monastery. The final Summit during the Reagan Presidency was in December, 1988. In what some called a “handing off” of the official relationship, President Reagan and President-elect (Vice President) George Bush traveled to New York to meet with Gorbachev. The unlikely pairing of a devoted anti-Communist advocate of capitalism with a dyed-in-the-wool Marxist resulted not only in the most significant arms reduction treaty in history, but in a permanent change in U.S.-Soviet relations. Neither country, nor the world, would ever be the same again” (Reagan Foundation). Fine in a fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Robert Anthony, Inc. Rare and desirable signed by Reagan, Bush and Gorbachev.

    Price: $8,800.00

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  • "I speak to-day for the preservation of the Union": Rare first edition pamphlet of Webster'sAddress Delivered Before the Washington Benevolent Society, at Portsmouth July 4, 1812

    WEBSTER, Daniel.

    An Address Delivered Before the Washington Benevolent Society, at Portsmouth July 4, 1812.

    Portsmouth, N.H.: Printed at the Oracle Press 1812.

    Rare first edition pamphlet of Daniel Webster’s Address regarding the work and maxims of George Washington, delivered before the Washington Benevolent Society in Portsmouth, New Hampshire on July 4, 1812. Octavo, original wrappers. In very good condition. Accompanied by a second edition of Mr. Webster’s Speech on Mr. Clay’s Resolutions delivered at the height of the debate over the Compromise of 1850 which is in very good condition.

    Price: $275.00

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  • “Always take all the time to reflect that circumstances permit, but when the time for action has come, stop thinking (Andrew Jackson)”: First Edition of Jon Meacham's American Lion; Inscribed by Him to a fellow writer

    MEACHAM, Jon.

    American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House.

    New York: Random House 2008.

    First edition of the author’s Pulitzer Prize-winning work. Octavo, original half cloth, pictorial endpapers. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the title page, “To Alex Timbers Jon Meacham.” The recipient Alex Timbers is a two-time Tony-nominated writer and director and the recipient of Golden Globe, Drama Desk, Outer Critics Circle, and London Evening Standard Awards, as well as two OBIE and Lucile Lortel Award. Fine in a fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Tom McKeveny.

    Price: $175.00

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  • First Edition of Herbert Hoover's America's First Crusade; Inscribed by Him

    HOOVER, Herbert.

    America’s First Crusade.

    New York: Charles Scribner's Sons 1942.

    First edition of Hoover’s look at the impact of World War I. Octavo, original gray cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper, “To Mrs. W.C. Van Antwerp with the kind regards of Herbert Hoover.” The recipient was the wife of well-known New York Stock Exchange member William Clarkson Van Antwerp. Near fine in a very good dust jacket with light rubbing.

    Price: $750.00

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  • First Edition of All the Best; Signed by George H.W. Bush and John Sununu

    BUSH, George H.W.

    All the Best: My Life in Letters and Other Writings.

    New York: Scribners 1999.

    First edition of George H. W. Bush’s life and letters. Octavo, original half cloth, illustrated. Signed by both George Bush and his chief of staff John Sununu on the title page. Fine in a fine dust jacket. Jacket design by John Fontana. Jacket photograph by Alexanders of Houston.

    Price: $650.00

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  • “The law is whatever is successfully argued and plausibly maintained": First Edition of Alexander Hamilton; Signed by Ron Chernow

    CHERNOW, Ron.

    Alexander Hamilton.

    New York: The Penguin Press 2004.

    First edition of this landmark biography of Alexander Hamilton. Octavo, original half cloth, illustrated. Signed by Ron Chernow on the title page. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with light shelfwear. Jacket design by Gabriele Wilson.

    Price: $475.00

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  • Large Lithograph of Nobel Peace Prize-Winner Albert Schweitzer; Signed by Him and Artist William Sharp

    SCHWEITZER, Albert; Artist William Sharp.

    Albert Schweitzer Signed Lithograph.

    Signed by the artist William Sharp in pencil. Inscribed by Nobel Peace Prize winner Albert Schweitzer, “A Mr John Zuber avec mes bonnes pensees Albert Schweitzer. Lambarene 13. Juin 1960.” The translation reads, “To Mr John Zuber with my good wishes Albert Schweitzer Lambarene 13th June 1960.” Schweitzer received the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize for his philosophy of “Reverence for Life”, expressed in many ways, but most famously in founding and sustaining the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, now in Gabon, west central Africa. The lithograph measures 14.5 inches by 11.5 inches. Double matted and framed. The entire piece measures 19 inches by 22.5 inches. A unique piece, rare and desirable.

     

     

    Price: $3,800.00

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  • "Fight has never been and is not now a fight for conquest of land, for accumulation of wealth or domination of peoples, but for the recognition and preservation of the rights of man and the establishment of a truly free world for a free people": Exceedingly Scarce Signed Photograph of Albert Luthuli

    LUTULI, Albert.

    Albert Lutuli Signed Photograph.

    Black and white photograph of Albert Lutuli, the first African to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Signed twice by him and dated by him 2/11/1961. The portrait shows Luthuli holding the telegram which announced his award of the Nobel Peace Prize for 1960. The reverse of the photograph is rubber stamped “Copyright Photograph supplied by The Natal Mercury, Devonshire Place, Durban”. In near fine condition.

    Price: $4,800.00

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  • Silver Gelatin Print of Albert Einstein; Signed and dated by Him

    EINSTEIN, Albert.

    Albert Einstein Signed Photograph.

    1952.

    Black and white silver gelatin photograph of Albert Einstein. Signed “A Einstein 52.” Group portrait showing Einstein standing between Talmudic scholar Tamar de Sola Pool and Hadassah National President Rebecca Beldner Shulman at his Princeton home in June of 1952 during a celebration marking the commencement of building of the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center in Jerusalem. The photograph measures 8 inches by 10 inches. Double matted and framed. The entire piece measures 13.5 inches by 15.5 inches. An exceptional photograph of Einstein, rare and desirable signed.

    Price: $9,800.00

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  • Silver Gelatin Print of Albert Einstein; Signed and dated by Him

    EINSTEIN, Albert.

    Albert Einstein Signed Photograph.

    1952.

    Black and white silver gelatin photograph of Albert Einstein. Signed “A Einstein 52.” Full-length group portrait showing Albert Einstein standing with Hadassah National President Rebecca Beldner Shulman and others at his Princeton home in June of 1952 during a celebration marking the commencement of building of the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center in Jerusalem. The photograph measures 8 inches by 9.5 inches. The entire piece measures 19 inches by 20.5 inches.  An exceptional piece.

    Price: $11,000.00

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  • First Edition of Theodore Roosevelt's African Game Trails; Inscribed by Theodore Roosevelt to General Sir Reginald Wingate

    ROOSEVELT, Theodore.

    African Game Trails. An Account of the African Wanderings of an American Hunter-Naturalist.

    New York: Charles Scribner's Sons 1910.

    First edition of Theodore Roosevelt’s classic work. Octavo, original cloth, gilt top edge, photogravure frontispiece, illustrated, 48 plates, map of Roosevelt’s route and hunting trips in Africa. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper, “To General Sir Reginald Wingate with the high regard of Theodore Roosevelt April 21st 1911.” The recipient, Reginald Wingate was a British general and administrator in Egypt and the Sudan. He earned the nom de guerre Wingate of the Sudan. In December 1899, on Lord Kitchener being summoned to South Africa, Sir Reginald Wingate succeeded him as Governor-General of the Sudan and Sirdar of the Egyptian Army, being promoted to local major general on 22 December 1899. His administration of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, between 1899 and 1916, achieved the colonial goals of the British Empire, with the colony regaining a degree of prosperity and its infrastructure being rebuilt and expanded. In near fine condition with light rubbing and wear to the extremities. Housed in a custom half calf clamshell box. A nice association, signed trade editions of African Game Trails are rare.

    Price: $9,800.00

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  • First Edition of Theodore Roosevelt's African Game Trails; in the Scarce original dust jacket

    ROOSEVELT, Theodore.

    African Game Trails. An Account of the African Wanderings of an American Hunter-Naturalist.

    New York: Charles Scribner's Sons 1910.

    First edition of Theodore Roosevelt’s classic work. Octavo, original cloth, gilt top edge, photogravure frontispiece, illustrated, 48 plates, map of Roosevelt’s route and hunting trips in Africa. Near fine in the original dust jacket with some chips and wear to the extremities. This is the first example we have seen in the dust jacket. Rare and desirable.

    Price: $2,800.00

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  • Inscribed Set of Herbert Hoover's Addresses Upon the American Road

    HOOVER, Herbert.

    Addresses Upon The American Road Complete Set.

    New York: Scribners and Van Nostrand and Stanford University Press 1938-1955.

    Signed and inscribed set of President Hoover’s famed addresses given upon the American Road. Octavo, 7 volumes. Each volume is inscribed by Herbert Hoover on the front free endpaper. Volume one is inscribed, “To my good friend Lewis Stevens from Herbert Hoover.” Volume 2, “Same as volume I with affection Herbert Hoover.” Volume 3, “Same as first and second volumes plus more affection Herbert Hoover.” Volume 4, “What more do you want? Herbert Hoover. Volume 5, “This one marks the last of the least but has the spirit of the other four volumes H.H.” Volume 5, “This is the next to the last. You would never read this far. Therefore no……….to you is needed Herbert Hoover.” Volume 7, “This is the last volume so far published. These could be more any adult education. Affectionately Herbert Hoover. Each are in near fine condition and each are first editions, first printings, with the exception of volume one. Rare and desirable signed.

    Price: $3,800.00

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  • Endorsement signed by President Lincoln with a rare carte-de-visite

    LINCOLN, Abraham.

    Abraham Lincoln Signed Endorsement.

    Rare Civil War dated endorsement as president, signed  by Abraham Lincoln, dated March 9, 1865. The endorsement reads, “Allow Mrs. C. W. Frazier to visit her husband a Prisoner of War at Johnson’s Island. A Lincoln.” In fine condition. In September 1863, Captain C. W. Frazer of Company B, Fifth Infantry, was captured and delivered to the Confederate officers’ prison camp located on Lake Erie’s Johnson’s Island. His wife, Letitia Frazer, who moved from Memphis, Tennessee to Sandusky, Ohio, so as to be nearer her detained husband, wrote an impassioned letter to President Lincoln, begging for ‘the opportunity to convince him that his duty is at home and to leave the Rebel Army.’ Without hesitation the president allowed Letitia Frazer, upon her taking the oath of allegiance, ‘an interview with her husband,’ once every ten days until his release. On June 11, 1865, Frazer was paroled and returned to Memphis and his family, resuming his law practice and becoming the president of the Confederate Historical Association of Memphis. Frazer later authored a war drama entitled Johnson’s Island, a play that featured ex-Confederate soldiers as its chief actors. The signed sheet measures 2 inches by 3.25 inches. Double matted and framed with a rare carte-de-visite of Lincoln. The entire piece measures 11.25 inches by 14.5 inches.

    Price: $14,000.00

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  • “A house divided against itself cannot stand": Rare Relief Bust Portrait of President Abraham Lincoln

    LINCOLN, Abraham.

    Abraham Lincoln Relief Bust.

    Rare caste metal relief portrait of President Abraham Lincoln in profile. Housed in a custom circular frame with gilt decorative floral reliefs. The entire piece measures 16 inches by 16 inches. A handsome example.

    Price: $1,800.00

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  • RARE NINETEENTH CENTURY PORTRAIT OF PRESIDENT ABRAHAM LINCOLN

    GARDNER, Alexander. (Abraham Lincoln).

    Abraham Lincoln Portrait.

    c. 1860.

    Rare original painting of the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. After a photograph by Civil War photographer Alexander Gardner. Scottish photographer Alexander Gardner immigrated to the United States in 1856 where he became best known for his photographs of the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln, and the execution of the conspirators to Lincoln’s assassination. In near fine condition. In a period frame. The entire piece measures 20.75 by 16.75 inches. Rare and desirable.

    Price: $3,500.00

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