Presidents and World Leaders

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  • Rare Typed Letter Signed by Ronald Reagan as President to close friend and fellow American actor Mickey Rooney

    REAGAN, Ronald. [Mickey Rooney].

    Typed Letter Signed by Ronald Reagan to Mickey Rooney.

    1984.

    Rare typed letter signed by Ronald Reagan shortly after his reelection in 1984 to close personal friend and fellow actor Mickey Rooney. One page, typescript on Reagan’s White House Letterhead, the letter is dated December 6, 1984 and reads in full, ‘Dear Jan and Mickey: Thanks for your message and most of all for your support and friendship. I cherish the victory and the confidence and trust it represents. The American people have given us the “go-ahead” to complete our agenda and I look forward to the next four years with great anticipation. Nancy joins me in sending out appreciation and warm regards. Sincerely, “Ron” Mr. and Mrs. Mickey Rooney 7500 Devista Drive Hollywood, California 90046.’ The recipient, American actor Mickey Rooney, appeared in more than 300 films and was among the last surviving stars of the silent-film era. He was the top box-office attraction from 1939 to 1941 and one of the best-paid actors of that era. Reagan, himself, was at the height of his acting career in the late 1930s and early 1940s, playing his favorite acting role in in 1942’s Kings Row, where he played a double amputee and recited the line “Where’s the rest of me?”—later used as the title of his 1965 autobiography. In near fine condition.

    Price: $600.00     Item Number: 114359

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  • John F. Kennedy Engraved Portrait; Signed by Ronald Reagan as Governor of California and 24 State and Lieutenant Governors

    REAGAN, Ronald. [John F. Kennedy].

    Ronald Reagan Signed John F. Kennedy Engraved Portrait.

    1967.

    Original engraved portrait of President John F. Kennedy signed by President Ronald Reagan as Governor of California and 24 State and Lieutenant Governors including: Nelson Rockefeller, John B. Connally, Tim Babcock, Jack Williams, Don Samuelson, John J. McKeith, Walter J. Hickel, and others. With a 13-cent “John F. Kennedy” stamp, cancelled on the anniversary of JFK’s birthday, May 29th 1967. Double matted and framed. The entire piece measures 19.5 inches by 16.5 inches. In fine condition.

    Price: $3,200.00     Item Number: 94707

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  • "Mr. Gorbachev Tear Down this Wall": First Edition of Ronald Reagan: The Wisdom and Humor of the Great Communicator; Inscribed by Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev

    REAGAN, Ronald; Edited by Frederick J. Ryan.

    Ronald Reagan: The Wisdom and Humor of the Great Communicator.

    San Francisco: Collins Publishers, 1995.

    First edition of this compilation of speeches from the 40th President of the United States. Octavo, original half cloth, illustrated throughout. Presentation copy, inscribed by Reagan on the half-title page, “To Jeannie Happy Birthday and Best Wishes Always Ronald Reagan.” Additionally signed by Mikhail Gorbachev on the half-title page. Fine in a fine dust jacket. Edited by Frederick J. Ryan, Jr. Rare and desirable signed by these two heads of states.

    Price: $4,800.00     Item Number: 103645

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  • Rare Family Photograph of the Reagan Family; Signed by President Ronald and First Lady Nancy Reagan

    REAGAN, Ronald and Nancy.

    Signed Family Photograph of Ronald and Nancy Reagan.

    Original photograph of President Ronald Reagan, First Lady Nancy Reagan and their two children: Ronald Jr. and Patti. Signed by the Presidential couple below each of their portraits, “Ronald Reagan” and “Nancy Reagan.” Double matted and framed, the photograph measures 10 inches by 8 inches. The entire piece measures 15 inches by 13.5 inches. In near fine condition.

    Price: $2,500.00     Item Number: 88159

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  • Fine collection of Inaugural Gifts from the Inauguration of Ronald Reagan as President and George H. W. Bush as Vice President of the United States

    REAGAN, Ronald and George H. W. Bush.

    Ronald Reagan and George Bush Inaugural Gift Collection.

    1981.

    Fine collection of official gifts from the inauguration of Ronald Reagan as President and George H. W. Bush as Vice President of the United States. The collection includes a sterling silver money clip and pill box embossed with the Reagan Bush inaugural logo and a fountain pen from the inaugural reception of George H. W. Bush bearing Bush’s signature in facsimile and housed in the original box bearing the seal of the Vice President of the United States. In near fine condition.

    Price: $1,450.00     Item Number: 117304

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  • First Edition of President Ronald Reagan's Abortion and the Conscience of the Nation; Signed by Him

    REAGAN, Ronald.

    Abortion and the Conscience of the Nation.

    Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1984.

    First edition. Octavo, original boards. Fine in a near fine dust jacket. Signed by Ronald Reagan on front free endpaper. Afterwords by C. Everett Koop and Malcolm Muggeridge. Rare signed.

    Price: $1,250.00     Item Number: 3123

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  • First Edition of Where’s the Rest of Me? The Ronald Reagan Story; Inscribed by Ronald Reagan

    REAGAN, Ronald.

    Where’s the Rest of Me? The Ronald Reagan Story.

    New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, 1965.

    First edition of Reagan’s biography covering his years in Hollywood. Octavo, original black cloth, illustrated. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper in a contemporary hand, “To Harry With every good wish Ronald Reagan.” Reagan has also corrected in his hand the word “Honey” opposite the title page to “Nancy.” Near fine in a very good jacket. Jacket design Ned Glattauer.

    Price: $2,250.00     Item Number: 109855

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  • First Edition of Where’s the Rest of Me? The Ronald Reagan Story; Inscribed by Ronald Reagan

    REAGAN, Ronald.

    Where’s the Rest of Me? The Ronald Reagan Story.

    New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, 1965.

    First edition. Octavo, original black cloth. Warmly inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper, “To Ray + Gladys In God We Trust Ronald Reagan.” Reagan has also corrected “Honey” to “Nancy” in his own hand, on the verso of the half title page. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with light wear to the extremities. Also, comes with Peter Pierce’s book The Presidential Journey of Ronald Wilson Reagan, signed by Peter Pierce.

    Price: $2,250.00     Item Number: 5316

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  • Where’s the Rest of Me? The Ronald Reagan Story; Inscribed by Ronald Reagan

    REAGAN, Ronald.

    Where’s the Rest of Me? The Ronald Reagan Story.

    New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, 1965.

    Fourth printing, published only months after the first of Reagan’s biography covering his years in Hollywood. Octavo, original black cloth, illustrated. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper in a contemporary hand, “To Russell With Best Wishes Ronald Reagan.” Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. Jacket design Ned Glattauer.

    Price: $975.00     Item Number: 110188

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  • First Edition of Where’s the Rest of Me? The Ronald Reagan Story; Signed by Ronald Reagan

    REAGAN, Ronald.

    Where’s the Rest of Me? The Ronald Reagan Story.

    New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, 1965.

    First edition. Octavo, original black cloth. Signed by the author on the front free endpaper in a contemporary hand, “Best Regards Ronald Reagan.” Reagan has also corrected in his hand the word “Honey” opposite the title page to “Nancy.” Fine in a very good dust jacket with some rubbing and closed tears. Jacket design Ned Glattauer.

    Price: $2,250.00     Item Number: 32081

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  • "Mr. Gorbachev, Tear Down This Wall": First Edition of Speaking My Mind; Signed by Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev

    REAGAN, Ronald.

    Speaking My Mind.

    New York: Simon and Schuster, 1989.

    First edition of President Reagan’s collection of speeches. Octavo, original half cloth, pictorial endpapers, illustrated. Signed by the author on the half-title page, “Ronald Reagan Jan. 6- ’92.” Additionally signed by Mikhail Gorbachev, former Soviet premier, counterpart to Reagan in the 1980s and Nobel Peace Prize winner. “When it came to communism, socialism and other systems that denied people their basic human rights, President Reagan was tough as nails. A devoted anti-communist, he was not afraid to say what needed to be said or do what needed to be done to bring freedom to people who were living under repressive regimes. In that regard, of all the foreign policy achievements of the Reagan Presidency, none is more important, or had more lasting impact on the world, than the fundamental change in U.S.-Soviet relations. It was not due to luck or accident. Speaking of U.S.-Soviet relations and his steadfast determination to reduce arms, President Reagan would often say: “We don’t mistrust each other because we’re armed; we’re armed because we mistrust each other.” He believed that if the mistrust was eliminated, then so, too, could the dangerous, destabilizing weapons. President Reagan was confident that if he could just get his Soviet counterpart in a room and tell him face-to-face that America had no hostile intent, the mistrust would begin to evaporate. Instinctively he knew that could not be accomplished through the traditional diplomacy of a bureaucratic State Department. So, to the horror of some long-time career government employees, he did what no President had ever done. While recovering from the assassination attempt in 1981, he handwrote a letter to Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev in reply to Brezhnev’s rather belligerent letter sent less than six weeks after President Reagan’s assumption of office. In his reply, President Reagan sought to find common ground and to establish a better tone to relations between the White House and the Kremlin. But as things turned out, the President would have to be patient. Brezhnev died in November 1982, and was replaced by Yuri Andropov. Less than 2 years later, Andropov died, and was succeeded by Constantin Chernenko. Incredibly, Chernenko died just 13 months later. To replace him, the Soviet high command chose a younger leader, Mikhail Gorbachev. It was Gorbachev with whom President Reagan would finally have that long-sought opportunity to begin to form a new relationship, one that would lead to a lessening of tensions between Washington and Moscow, and eventually to meaningful arms reduction. The first of their five meetings was on “neutral turf.” It took place in Geneva, Switzerland in November 1985. In a small plain boat house just down a stone path from Fleur D’Eau, the grand chateau where their formal sessions took place, President Reagan and General Secretary Gorbachev sat down in two comfortable chairs in front of a roaring fireplace, and with only interpreters present, began to forge a relationship that would not only improve U.S.-Soviet relations, but would turn out to be the beginning of the end of Soviet domination of Eastern Europe and ultimately, of the Soviet Union itself. Almost a year later, the two leaders got together again, this time in Reykjavik, Iceland. In a summit meeting not long in the making, they met at Hofdi House, a picturesque waterfront structure that was once the French consulate. There they came tantalizingly close to an agreement to eliminate all medium-range missiles based in Europe. But at the last minute, Gorbachev insisted that the United States abandon plans for a space-based missile defense system. Despite President Reagan’s offer to share the system’s technology with the Soviet Union so that both countries could be protected, Gorbachev dug in his heels and would not budge. The last thing Ronald Reagan would ever do would be to risk America’s safety for the sake of an agreement. The Summit was over. The anger and sadness was etched in President Reagan’s face as he emerged from Hofdi House. There was chatter that this was the end of the Reagan-Gorbachev relationship, and that there would be no more Summits. But President Reagan knew better. Partly because of his natural optimism, and partly because he believed that Gorbachev shared his desire to make the world safer, he was certain that eventually talks would resume. The President directed his team to keep the dialogue going and to see whether the progress made in Reykjavik could be the basis for successful negotiations going forward. That’s exactly what happened.It is a noteworthy measure of the confidence President Reagan had in the strength of his relationship with Gorbachev that just 8 months after Reykjavik, he boldly called on him to tear down the Berlin Wall. Just as he expected, in December, 1987, President and Mrs. Reagan welcomed the Gorbachevs to Washington for the third Summit. This time, the mood was upbeat and even celebratory. In a glittering East Room ceremony on December 8th, the two leaders signed the historic INF Treaty, eliminating all nuclear-armed ground-launched ballistic and cruise missiles with ranges between 500 and 5,000 kilometers. For the first time ever, the amount of nuclear arms was actually being reduced rather than merely limited. In the Spring of 1988 the Reagans traveled to Moscow for Summit #4. From a historical perspective, the highlight of that trip was the Kremlin ceremony at which President Reagan and General Secretary Gorbachev signed the now-ratified INF Treaty, but the Reagans also found time to enjoy some cultural treats including the Bolshoi Ballet and a visit to a monastery. The final Summit during the Reagan Presidency was in December, 1988. In what some called a “handing off” of the official relationship, President Reagan and President-elect (Vice President) George Bush traveled to New York to meet with Gorbachev. The unlikely pairing of a devoted anti-Communist advocate of capitalism with a dyed-in-the-wool Marxist resulted not only in the most significant arms reduction treaty in history, but in a permanent change in U.S.-Soviet relations. Neither country, nor the world, would ever be the same again” (Reagan Foundation). Fine in a fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Barry Littmann. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. An exceptional piece of history.

    Price: $5,500.00     Item Number: 111944

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  • Rare Collection of Ronald Reagan Presidential Gift Accessories

    REAGAN, Ronald.

    Ronald Reagan Presidential Seal Gift Accessory Collection.

    Fine collection of Ronald Reagan Presidential gift accessories including a pair of cuff links and a lapel pin bearing the Presidential Eagle and Crest seal and a fountain pen bearing Reagan’s signature in facsimile. Each piece is housed in the original gift box with Reagan’s signature stamped in gilt to the box cover. In fine condition with the pen requiring a nib insert. A handsome collection.

    Price: $1,250.00     Item Number: 114264

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  • "We both wound up with briefcase jobs! Warmest regards, Ron": Photograph of Ronald Reagan and Ambassador Price; Inscribed by Reagan

    REAGAN, Ronald.

    Ronald Reagan Signed Photograph.

    Official White House photograph showing President Ronald Reagan and Ambassador Charles Price at the White House carrying their briefcases, inscribed by Reagan, “Dear Charlie – We both wound up with briefcase jobs! Warmest regards, Ron.” The recipient, Charles H. Price was a Kansas City businessman who met Ronald Reagan in the early 1970s. The Price’s held several receptions on Reagan’s behalf during the 1976 Republican National Convention in Kansas City. Price helped raise money for Reagan’s 1980 presidential run, and in 1981 he was named ambassador to Belgium, where he served until his appointment to Britain. He took over as ambassador to the Court of St. James’s in November 1983, a moment of unease between Britain and the U.S. Mrs. Thatcher was upset because she had not been notified before the American invasion of Grenada the previous month, and many British elected officials opposed a plan to station American cruise missiles in Britain. During his five years as ambassador, Price participated in talks between the British and the Irish Republican Army and helped Mrs. Thatcher defuse protests after the U.S. used British bases to carry out attacks on Libya in 1986. He also deployed his sense of humor and Midwestern humility to try easing the anti-American sentiment that Reagan’s policies had stoked among many Britons: he hosted elaborate receptions for members of government and the royal family, became a familiar face on television news and talk shows and, on occasion, made widely publicized visits to pubs to hear the viewpoints of working-class citizens. Double matted and framed. The entire piece measures 14 inches by 12.75 inches. In fine condition.

    Price: $1,850.00     Item Number: 110180

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  • personal note warmly inscribed by ronald reagan in September of 1987

    REAGAN, Ronald.

    Ronald Reagan Autographed Note Signed.

    Autograph note signed by Ronald Reagan on his personal letterhead as follows, “20 Sept. ’89 Dear Ford and Norma, Thanks for your letter and generous words, I’m more grateful than I can say. Thank you too for your prayers. They were answered & I have had an almost instant recovery, at home and feeling just great. Nancy sends her best to you. Again thanks & Best Regards, Ron.” In September if 1989, President Ronald Reagan underwent routine brain surgery for the removal of a subdural hematoma resulted from a horse-back riding accident. An accomplished rider, he was thrown from a bucking horse while visiting the ranch of personal friend William Wilson in Cananea, Mexico. Matted and framed. Affixed to the back of the frame is the envelope in which the letter was sent addressed in Reagan’s hand: “Mr. and Mrs. Ford B. Ford 12115 Breckenridge Lane Woodbridge, Va. 22192.” Reagan has also signed his name in pen in the return address. The entire piece measures 18 inches by 13.5 inches. Rare and desirable.

    Price: $1,250.00     Item Number: 85495

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  • "There is no greater human need, no greater human gift than to love a child": First Edition of Nancy Reagan's To Love a Child; Inscribed by Her

    REAGAN, Nancy.

    To Love a Child.

    New York: Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1982.

    First edition. Octavo, original half cloth. Inscribed by Nancy Reagan on the half-title page. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

    Price: $125.00     Item Number: 41039

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  • “A WOMAN IS LIKE A TEABAG - ONLY IN HOT WATER DO YOU REALIZE HOW STRONG SHE IS”: First Edition of My Turn: The Memoirs of Nancy Reagan; Inscribed by Her

    REAGAN, Nancy.

    My Turn: The Memoirs of Nancy Reagan.

    New York: Random House, 1989.

    First edition of Nancy Reagan’s memoirs. Octavo, original half cloth, illustrated. Boldly inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper, “To Gene Williams Best Wishes Nancy Reagan Apr ’92.” Fine in a fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Robert Aulicino. Written in collaboration with William Novak.

    Price: $125.00     Item Number: 1860

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  • “A WOMAN IS LIKE A TEABAG - ONLY IN HOT WATER DO YOU REALIZE HOW STRONG SHE IS”: First Edition of My Turn: The Memoirs of Nancy Reagan; Inscribed by Her

    REAGAN, Nancy.

    My Turn: The Memoirs of Nancy Reagan.

    New York: Random House, 1989.

    First edition of Nancy Reagan’s memoirs. Octavo, original half cloth, illustrated. Boldly inscribed by Nancy Reagan on the half-title page. Laid in is a note from her office thanking the recipient for the letter. Fine in a fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Robert Aulicino. Written in collaboration with William Novak.

    Price: $150.00     Item Number: 64571

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  • First edition of John H. Reagan's Memoirs with Special Reference to Secession and the Civil War

    REAGAN, John H.

    Memoirs with Special Reference to Secession and the Civil War.

    New York: The Neale Publishing Company, 1906.

    First edition of the Civil War era statesman’s autobiography. Octavo, original cloth decorated with gilt titles and central gilt Confederate emblem, illustrated, tissue-guarded engraved frontispiece. Edited by Walter Flavius McCaleb. Introduction by George P. Garrison. In near fine condition. Uncommon in this condition.

    Price: $600.00     Item Number: 116934

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  • Inscribed by the President of the Philippines to Henry Kissinger

    RAMOS, Fidel (Henry Kissinger).

    Philippines: A Vision For The Nations.

    Philippines: Studio Designs, 1995.

    First edition. Quarto, original boards. Inscribed by Philippines President Fidel V. Ramos (while in office) to the great American elder statesman of world affairs Henry Kissinger, “To Dr. Henry Kissinger with best wishes. Mabuhay! Fidel Ramos 8 Jan 96.” Ramos was the 12th President of the Philippines, serving 1992-1998 after succeeding Corazon Aquino (who endorsed Ramos.) Includes a short introductory essay by Ramos. A nice association.

    Price: $450.00     Item Number: 5314

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  • "You don't make peace with friends. You make it with very unsavory enemies": First Edition of The Rabin Memoirs; Inscribed by Him in the Year of Publication

    RABIN, Yitzhak.

    The Rabin Memoirs.

    Boston: Little, Brown & Company, 1979.

    First edition in English of the memoirs of Yitzhak Rabin. Octavo, original half cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the half-title page in the year of publication, “To Eleanore with best wishes Y. Rabin 10.31.79.” Fine in a fine dust jacket. Jacket design by John Renfer. Photograph by Magnum photographer Leonard Freed.

    Price: $1,250.00     Item Number: 92754

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