Signed

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  • "Who is the most important person I've ever met in a signing queue & the first person ever to see merit in Harry Potter. With huge [underlined 4 times] thanks. J.K. Rowling": First Edition, First Printing of J.K. Rowling's Rare First Book Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone; Signed by Her

    ROWLING, J.K.

    Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone.

    London: Bloomsbury, 1997.

    First edition, first printing with all the prerequisite first issue points called for (including “wand” listed twice on page 53). Octavo, original illustrated boards, without a dust jacket as issued. Association copy, inscribed by the author on the dedication page,  “to Bryony – who is the most important person I’ve ever met in a signing queue & the first person ever to see merit in Harry Potter. With huge [underlined 4 times] thanks. J.K. Rowling.” The recipient, Bryony Evens worked as an office manager in a small publishing company in Edinburgh, Scotland. In 1995 J.K. Rowling sent the first three chapters of Harry Potter to that publishing company and it would have gone unseen if it wasn’t for Bryony. Bryony read them and fell in love with the story, and encouraged her boss Christopher Little to ask Rowling for the full book. Rowling then sent a full copy to Bryony when it was published by Bloomsbury in 1997. A year later Bryony went to visit Rowling at a book signing event, and when Rowling recognized her she gave her a big hug and wrote a special inscription, or message, in the book she’d brought. In near fine condition with a touch of rubbing to the extremities. Only 500 copies of the first printing were published, with over half making their way to libraries. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. An exceptional association and effusive inscription to the person who first recognized the value of Harry Potter.

    Price: $300,000.00     Item Number: 115640

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  • First edition of the Ian Fleming’s first book Casino Royale which introduced the world to 007: Inscribed by Ian Fleming to Classmate and Novelist Ralph Arnold

    FLEMING, Ian.

    Casino Royale.

    London: Jonathan Cape, 1953.

    First edition of the first novel in Ian Fleming’s James Bond series. Octavo, original black cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper, “To Ralph, We have now both reduced our remainders by one copy! Ian.” With a note of explanation by the recipient underneath, “I having told Ian, from the depths of my publishing experience, that he would be lucky if he made £200 out of this, his first thriller!! R.A.” The recipient Ralph Arnold was a novelist, historical writer and publisher who joined Constable in 1936 and was chairman from 1958 to 1962. Arnold and Fleming studied together at the Tennerhof School in Kitzbühel, Austria, and it was there that both made their first forays into story-writing. Having left Sandhurst without obtaining a commission, Fleming “was sent to ‘sort himself out’ at a quasi-finishing school for men in Kitzbühel … There, while skiing and climbing mountains, he came under the benevolent tutelage of Ernan Forbes Dennis, a former British spy turned educationalist, and his wife, Phyllis Bottome, an established novelist. Forbes Dennis brought out Fleming’s aptitude for languages and introduced him to literature, while his wife encouraged him to write his first stories.” (Oxford DNB). Near fine in a near fine first state dust jacket (without the Sunday Times review on the inner front flap) with the lightest of rubbing to the extremities. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box.

    Price: $150,000.00     Item Number: 98575

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  • Rare Isaac Newton Manuscript highlighting his controversial theological views, which were kept hidden for hundreds of years.

    NEWTON, Isaac.

    Isaac Newton Original Manuscript.

    Rare full page folio autograph manuscript of Isaac Newton, father of physics and modern science and author of important texts such as the Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica, Opticks, and many more. While Newton is mostly known for his scientific and mathematical pursuits and is considered to be one of the most influential scientists of all time, his controversial theological views, which were kept hidden for centuries, were as brilliant as his science and an extension of his search for truth. Many believe theology was actually his first love, as he wrote more about religion than he did about science. Of Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica, he stated, “When I wrote my treatise about our Systeme I had an eye upon such Principles as might work with considering men for the beliefe of a Deity and nothing can rejoyce me more than to find it useful for that purpose”. He wrote in the Principa, “This most beautiful system of the sun, planets, and comets, could only proceed from the counsel and dominion of an intelligent Being. . . . This Being governs all things, not as the soul of the world, but as Lord over all. . . . The Supreme God is a Being eternal, infinite, absolutely perfect.” While he believed in a supreme God, early in his career at Trinity College, his theological research of original texts led him to believe that authentic Christianity had been perverted by corrupted by the early church fathers and that the brand of religion that was now accepted as orthodox by the Roman Catholic Church and to some extent, by the Church of England, was not completely true. He discovered that the final phrases of 1 John 5:7  ‘and these three are one’ was not present in any Greek version that he studied and came to the conclusion that it was a deliberate addition to the text to provide justification for the doctrine of the Trinity. He concluded that the orthodox notion of the Trinity was a fiction that was invented in the early fourth century. This document is very important, as its contents deal with these controversial issues. Written in English and some Latin, he writes concerning an Epistle of Emperor Constantine regarding the Arian debate and the Council of Nicea, which laid out the famous doctrinal statement, the Nicene Creed. The Nicene Creed was adopted to resolve the Arian controversy, whose leader, Arius, a clergyman of Alexandria, “objected to Alexander’s (the bishop of the time) apparent carelessness in blurring the distinction of nature between the Father and the Son by his emphasis on eternal generation”. In reply, Alexander accused Arius of denying the divinity of the Son and also of being too “Jewish” and “Greek” in his thought. Alexander and his supporters created the Nicene Creed to clarify the key tenets of the Christian faith in response to the widespread adoption of Arius’ doctrine, which was henceforth marked as heresy. Because of these views, Newton’s theological writings, were marked “Not fit to be printed”. They were stored and were not in the public until the economist John Maynard Keynes and Jewish scholar and businessman, Abraham Yahuda, acquired many of them in 1936. There are very few of these original writings left in private hands, as the majority of the manuscripts are being held in collection at the Cambridge University Library, at the Kings College (a gift of John Maynard Keynes), the Jewish National and University Library (now National Library of Israel), the Bodleian Library at Oxford University, the Fondation Martin Bodmer in Geneva, and the Grace K. Babson collection now housed in the Huntington Library in California. This rare piece of history is a highlight for those interested in both Newton’s scientific and theological endeavors. Matted and framed.

     

     

     

    Price: $150,000.00     Item Number: 119750

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  • "ONCE THERE WAS A LITTLE TREE ... AND SHE LOVED A LITTLE BOY"; The Original Manuscript for shel Silverstein's masterpiece The Giving Tree

    SILVERSTEIN, Shel.

    The Giving Tree Original Autograph Manuscript.

    c. 1964.

    The original manuscript of one of the most commercially successful children’s books of all time and Shel Silverstein’s most famous work, The Giving Tree, entirely in his had with his publisher’s edits in pencil throughout. Quarto, 38 pasteboard pages with Silverstein’s original ink drawings on paper adhered to each page and Silverstein’s original handwritten text. With numerous revisions by Silverstein, most notably on the final page of the story where Silverstein has changed “and the boy and the tree were happy” to “And the tree was happy.” In very good condition. Lacking pages 2, 3, 4 and 36. A remarkable piece offering exclusive insight into the author/illustrator’s process and furthering the mysterious and ambiguous nature of the widely interpreted story of a selfless tree and her beloved companion.

    Price: $125,000.00     Item Number: 116388

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  • "on her 21st birthday from her admirer": The Great Gatsby; Inscribed by F. Scott Fitzgerald

    FITZGERALD, F. Scott.

    The Great Gatsby.

    New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1925.

    First edition, second printing of the author’s masterpiece. Octavo, original green cloth, gilt titles to the spine. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper, “For Esther Sidman on her 21st birthday from her admirer. F Scott Fitzgerald, Hollywood, 1938.” In near fine condition with a touch of shelfwear. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. Great Gatsby’s signed and inscribed by Fitzgerald are rare.

    Price: $92,000.00     Item Number: 93465

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  • "One need not be a prophet to be aware of impending dangers. An accidental combination of experience and interest will often reveal events to one man under aspects which few yet see": Rare First English Edition of The Road To Serfdom; Signed by F.A. Hayek

    HAYEK, Friedrich August von [F.A.].

    The Road To Serfdom.

    London: Routledge & Sons, 1944.

    First edition of one of the most influential and popular expositions of classical liberalism ever published. Octavo, original black cloth. Signed by F.A. Hayek on the title page. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with light rubbing to the spine tips. The British edition (which this example is) was published in March of 1944, preceding its American counterpart, which was published later that same year in September. Housed in a custom full morocco clamshell box. Rare signed.

    Price: $78,000.00     Item Number: 117650

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  • "ALL 'CLASSES' FOR EXPERIENCE AND LEARNING – BUT I DO PREFER 'NON-LITERARY' PEOPLE LIKE WAITERS, TRUCKDRIVERS, GIRLS, CARPENTERS, CLAM DIGGERS, RAILROAD MEN, SEA MEN, OLD MILLIONAIRES, ALL THE 'CHARACTERS'”; SCARCE JACK KEROUAC AUTOGRAPHED SIGNED LETTER

    KEROUAC, Jack.

    Jack Kerouac Autographed Manuscript.

    1964.

    Jack Kerouac’s candid handwritten reply to a young man’s questions about being a “Beatnik,” his life philosophy, his thoughts on Montana, and more. Students in Robert Dodd’s ninth-grade class were given an assignment to contact their favorite writer with their own unique series of questions relating specifically to that writer. The young Dodd chose Jack Kerouac, and the author replied at length to his questionnaire, which includes queries about his classification as a “Beatnik” (his answer: “I never was a Beatnik – it was the newspapers and critics who tagged that label on me….”), life philosophy (“My philosophy is ‘No Philosophy,’ just ‘Things-As-They-Are’”), career goals (“Be a great writer making everybody believe in Heaven”), the ideal way of life (“Hermit in the woods…”), his thoughts on fame (“My name is like Crackerjacks, famous, but very few people buy my books…”), and segregation (“[t]he Irish and Italians of Massachusetts never paraded in protest, just worked hard and made it”). Interestingly, Kerouac is most expansive in response to the final question: whether he has visited Montana. His answer fills three-quarters of the page, beginning: “Great day, my favorite state! – I wrote about Montana in ‘On the Road’ but the publishers took it out behind my back… I stayed one night, but up all night, in a saloon in Butte, to keep out of the 40-below February cold, among sheep ranchers playing poker.” Two pages with Dodd’s questions type-written and Kerouac’s responses handwritten in full. The letter reads in full, “To Robert Dodd from Jack Kerouac Feb. 28th 1964.” 1. In Town and the Country (Kerouac crosses out Country for City) your style of writing is much different from The Lonesome Traveler. Do you change your style with the type of story? Kerouac responds: “‘The Town and the City’ was my first, youngman novel when I was just starting out, trying to write like Thomas Wolfe – ‘Lonesome Traveler’ is a product of my own style which I developed in later years, ‘spontaneous writing’ with no looking back, in my own laws of story telling – OUTERSPACE PROSE! My own original invention.” 2.  Many people have referred to you as a “beatnik” or a “way out” writer. Do you feel this way about yourself? “‘Way-out’ yes, but I never was a beatnik – it was the newspapers and critics who tagged that label on me – I never had a beard, never wore sandals, avoided the company of Bohemians and their politics and always had a job on the road like in ‘Lonesome T.’ on railroad, ships etc.” 3. Some people refer to your thinking as existentialism where man makes his own destiny. Just what is your philosophy of life? “My philosophy now is “no-philosophy,” just “Things – As – They – Are”. 4. What goal are you trying to reach in your career? “Be a great writer making everybody believe in Heaven.” 5. What do you think is the ideal way of life? “Hermit in the woods, one-room cabin, wood stove, oil lamp, books, food, outhouse, no electricity, just creek or brook water, sleep, hiking, nothing-to-do-(Chinese Wu Wei).” 6. Do you like fame or would you rather write and have only your works become famous? “My name is like Crackerjacks, famous, but very few people buy my books because they’ve been told by newspapers and critics that I’m crazy, so I’m almost broke now 1964 – I hate fame without fortune, which is really INFAMY AND RIDICULE, in my case.” 7. From your many books I see that you must travel a lot. Do you try to mix in with different classes or do you stick to one? “All ‘classes’ for experience and learning – but I do prefer ‘non-literary’ people like waiters, truckdrivers, girls, carpenters, clam diggers, railroad men, sea men, old millionaires, all the ‘characters’.” 8. Does the West coast influence an author’s style differently than the East coast? “No – I and the “Beats” came from the East Coast and just rode out there, no special difference in style except a little on subject matter, i.e. open-spaces country.” 9. What is your favorite subject matter? “That everybody goes to Heaven – read “Visions of Gerard” (about Lowell in 1926).” 10. Here in Boston there is much controversy over segregation of the negroes. What is your stand on the issue? “They need jobs, naturally, and education for better jobs – But the Irish and Italians of Massachusetts never paraded in protest, just worked harder, and made it.” 11. Do you plan to visit the East coast, especially the Boston area soon? “Yeh – “lecture” dinner at Harvard soon – I live in Long Island since 1958 so I can’t exactly “visit” the Ease Coast, hey,” –  12. Have you ever been to Montana and, if you have, what were your views on it? “Great day, my favorite state! – I wrote about Montana in “On the Road” but the publishers took it out behind my back – I stayed one night, up all night, in a saloon in Butte, to keep out of the 40- below February cold, among sheep ranchers playing poker (with sheep dogs at their feet), red-eyed drunken Indians drinking out of bottles in the john, Chinese gamblers, women, cowboys, miners – And outside of Butte, at Three Forks Montana, I saw the source of the Missouri River in the snowy valley – I also heard wolves howl in the Bitterroot Mountains – But I didn’t like Missoula much (skiers etc.) – I would like to have a summer cabin in Montana some day, the last truly “Western” state. Sincerely, Jack Kerouac.” In near fine condition. Matted and framed. The entire piece measures 31 inches by 18 inches. A rare and intimate glimpse into the thought an literary progression of one of the formative writers of the 20th century.

    Price: $75,000.00     Item Number: 79098

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  • "Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird"; First edition of To Kill A Mockingbird; Signed by Harper Lee and Truman Capote

    LEE, Harper (Truman Capote).

    To Kill a Mockingbird.

    Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company, 1960.

    First edition of Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel which had an initial first printing of 5,000 copies. Octavo, original green cloth backed brown boards, titles to spine in gilt. Signed by both Harper Lee and Truman Capote on the front free endpaper. Truman Capote’s friendship with Harper Lee began in the summer of 1929 when the two became next door neighbors in Monroeville, Alabama; both were the age of five. They shared a love of reading and began collaborating when Lee was gifted a typewriter by her father as a child. Lee drew on their friendship as inspiration for the characters Lee and Scout in her masterpiece To Kill A Mockingbird; Capote based his tomboy character Idabel Thompkins in his first novel Other Voices, Other Rooms on Lee. They worked together on Capote’s true crime novel, In Cold Blood; Lee acted as his ‘assistant reasearchist’ and edited the final draft of the book. Upon its publication in 1965, Capote failed to acknowledge Lee’s contributions to the book, after which their relationship was never the same. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with light rubbing and wear to the extremities. Jacket design by Shirley Smith. Photograph by Truman Capote. Housed in a custom full morocco clamshell box. Exceptionally rare, this is the first example we have seen signed by both Lee and Capote.

    Price: $72,000.00     Item Number: 73100

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  • "If you liked The Great Gatsby, for God's sake read this. Gatsby was a tour de force but this is a confession of faith": First Edition of Tender Is the Night; Inscribed by F. Scott Fitzgerald To Hollywood Producer Harry Joe Brown

    FITZGERALD, F. Scott.

    Tender Is The Night. A Romance. Decorations by Edward Shenton.

    New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1934.

    First edition of the work which Fitzgerald considered to be his finest. Octavo, original green cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper with a full page inscription, “For Harry Joe Brown – late of the 17th Infantry Brigade. Wounded in Hollywood 1920-1940. – from his fellow dough boy F Scott Fitzgerald Encino, 1939.” The recipient, Harry Joe Brown was a Hollywood producer, who Fitzgerald noted meeting in late 1939: “Somewhere around this time [September 1939] Harry Joe Brown called me over to Twentieth Century Fox on a Sonja Heine picture” (Letter to the Berg-Allenberg Agency, 23 February 1940). Fitzgerald had been contracted as a writer by Metro Goldwyn Meyer Studios in the July of 1937, initially for six months. His contract was then extended for another year, but when this lapsed in December 1938 MGM did not renew it. Over the next two years, Fitzgerald freelanced for numerous studios on a number of films, including Everything Happens at Night for which Brown was an associate producer. An excellent near fine example in a very good first issue dust jacket with some light wear. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box.

    Price: $65,000.00     Item Number: 7340

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  • First Edition of George Orwell's Burmese Days; Inscribed by Him

    ORWELL, George.

    Burmese Days.

    New York: Harper & Brothers, 1934.

    First American edition and true first preceding the British edition by one year of Orwell’s first novel. Octavo, original cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the verso of the front free endpaper to Mabel Fierz, “With very best wishes from Eric Blair.” It was Mabel Fierz who introduced Orwell to Leonard Moore (who would later become his literary agent) after salvaging the manuscript for Down and Out from the writer’s discarded papers. After first meeting Orwell in Southwold, Suffolk, Mabel and her husband Francis became close friends with the writer and often invited him to stay at their house in Golders Green. On one such occasion, Orwell gave Mabel the manuscript, which had just been rejected by Faber, and telling her to save only the paperclips, said she should throw it away. Instead she took it in person to Moore who in turn took it to Gollancz. In gratitude, thereafter Orwell presented Mabel with signed copies of all his published works. Mabel Fierz, authorial inscription, typed letter signed by Mabel’s son Adrian Fierz loosely inserted. Near fine in a very good dust jacket. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box.

    Price: $55,000.00     Item Number: 67096

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  • “To President Kennedy per your request – here are our hands, our hearts, our votes": Inscribed by Presidents Lyndon B. Johnson and Harry S. Truman to President John F. Kennedy

    KENNEDY, John F.; Harry S. Truman; Lyndon B. Johnson.

    Signed Photograph of John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson and Harry S. Truman.

    1962.

    Photograph of Presidents John F. Kennedy, Harry S. Truman and Lyndon B. Johnson in a three-way handshake, taken on January 20, 1962 at the Grand Staircase, Entrance Hall at the White House. Inscribed by both Johnson and Truman to Kennedy, “To President Kennedy per your request – here are our hands, our hearts, our votes – Lyndon B. Johnson.” Inscribed by Truman “From Harry Truman to a great president, John F. Kennedy, February 19, 1962.” A rare photograph capturing three significant figureheads of the Democratic Party. In fine condition. Photograph by Robert L. Knudsen. From the collection of President Kennedy, later owned by his friend and special assistant, David Powers. Double matted and framed. The entire piece measures 18.5 inches by 24 inches.  An exceptional piece of history, inscribed by two Presidents to another President.

    Price: $50,000.00     Item Number: 65010

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  • "The truth is rarely pure and never simple": Signed limited large-paper edition of The Importance of Being Earnest

    WILDE, Oscar.

    The Importance of Being Earnest: A Trivial Comedy for Serious People.

    London: Leonard Smithers and Co, 1899.

    Signed limited large-paper edition of the author’s masterpiece, number 68 of 100 copies signed by Oscar Wilde on the limitation page. Octavo, original pale purple cloth, gilt titles to the spine, gilt floral motifs from designs by Charles Shannon on spine and covers, edges untrimmed.  Presentation copy, with an autograph letter signed by the third and final wife of Nobel Prize-winning playwright Eugene O’Neill, actress Carlotta Monterey O’Neill, to stage actor Harrison K. Ford laid in which reads, “To Harrison Ford Do hope you will enjoy this!- All good wishes Carlotta Monterey O’Neill Dec 6th 31 1095 Park Ave.-” From the library of Harrison K. Ford with his bookplate to the front pastedown. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. In near fine condition. An exceptional example with noted provenance.

    Price: $50,000.00     Item Number: 110755

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  • “People generally see what they look for, and hear what they listen for": First edition of To Kill A Mockingbird; Inscribed by Harper Lee

    LEE, Harper.

    To Kill a Mockingbird.

    Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company, 1960.

    First edition of Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel which had an initial first printing of 5,000 copies. Octavo, original green cloth backed brown boards, titles to spine in gilt. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper in a contemporary hand, “To Jennie with my best wishes Nelle Lee.” The recipient must have been a person close to the author, as Lee reserved inscriptions using the name Nelle family members and close friends. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket with light rubbing and wear to the extremities. Jacket design by Shirley Smith. Photograph of Lee on the back panel by Truman Capote. Housed in a custom full morocco clamshell box.

    Price: $50,000.00     Item Number: 99740

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  • “Don't you know that everybody's got a Fairyland of their own?”: Rare First Edition of Mary Poppins; Signed by P.L. Travers

    TRAVERS, P.L.

    Mary Poppins.

    London: Gerald Howe, 1934.

    First edition of this children’s classic. Octavo, original cloth, illustrated with 27 line cuts (13 full-page) and chapter tailpieces by Mary Shepard. Signed by P.L. Travers on the front free endpaper. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with light rubbing and wear to the crown of the spine. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. Signed first editions are of exceptional rarity, with none having appeared at auction since the time of publication.

    Price: $48,000.00     Item Number: 54060

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  • First Edition of Capitalism and Freedom; Inscribed by Milton Friedman to Fellow Nobel Prize-Winning Economist Merton Miller

    FRIEDMAN, Milton; With the Assistance of Rose Friedman.

    Capitalism And Freedom.

    Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1962.

    First edition of Friedman’s magnum opus. Octavo, original blue cloth. Association copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper to colleague and friend, “For Merton Miller with many thanks for his assistance Milton Friedman.” Fine in a very good dust jacket with light rubbing. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. An exceptional association, linking these two Nobel Prize-winning economists and giants in the field, as Friedman revolutionized economic theory with his free-market, free-from-government principles and Miller changing the way markets assess a company’s value.

    Price: $48,000.00     Item Number: 87436

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  • Exceedingly rare new and revised edition of M. de Bourrienne's Life of Napoleon extra-illustrated with  additional portraits and views and over 50 autograph letters and notes signed by Napoleon I,  members of his family, and royal associates

    DE BOURRIENNE, Fauvelet. [Napoleon].

    Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte.

    London: Richard Bentley and Son, 1885.

    Exceedingly rare edition of M. de Bourrienne’s Life of Napoleon extra-illustrated with additional portraits and views and over 50 autograph letters and notes signed by Napoleon I,  members of his family, associates, and the author bound in. Octavo, bound in three quarters scarlet morocco with gilt titles and tooling to the spine in six compartments within raised gilt bands, marbled endpapers, top edge gilt with others uncut, tissue-guarded frontispiece and full color portrait to each volume, illustrated with engravings issued in the initial publication and over 100 extra portraits and views bound in. With over 50 autograph letters signed bound in including 3 autograph letters signed by Napoleon I (bound into Vol. I page 201, Vol. I page 369, and Vol. III page 530), and autograph letters signed by Charles J. Bernadotte, King of Spain; Joseph Bonaparte, King of Spain; Fauvelet de Bourrienne; A.A.L. Caulincort, Duc de Vicenza; Marquis Emmanuel Grouchy; Napoleon’s second wife Marie Louise. Duchess of Parma; Joachim Murat, King of Naples; Comte Horace Sebastiani, and Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington among others. With the original compiler’s printed catalog of extra material detailing the location (volume and page number) of each added engraving and autograph letter signed.  In near fine condition. Accompanied by an additional military endorsement signed by Napoleon during the Peninsular War, “Approuvé  Np.” An exceptional collection of significant Napoleonic era signatures.

    Price: $45,000.00     Item Number: 117078

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  • “I am a poet in deeds-not often in words": FIRST EDITION OF IAN FLEMING’S GOLDFINGER; WARMLY INSCRIBED BY HIM

    FLEMING, Ian.

    Goldfinger.

    London: Jonathan Cape, 1959.

    First edition of the seventh novel in Ian Fleming’s James Bond series. Octavo, original black cloth. Association copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper in the year of publication, “From Ian with love for Jo. May 6, 1959.” The recipient is Josephine Hartford Bryce, husband Ivar Bryce, often cited as one of the primary models for James Bond. Fleming named the character Felix Leiter, Bond’s friend and CIA operative, in part after Ivar Bryce, whose middle name was Felix. The Bryce’s spent their summers at Black Hole Hollow Farm in Vermont, where Fleming was frequently a guest. He spent summers there hiking and plotting his Bond novels. Fleming first conceived the plot for Diamonds are Forever at the farm, and the primary setting of For Your Eyes Only, Echo Park in Vermont, is based on the farm. Fine in a fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Richard Chopping. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. A significant association copy.

    Price: $45,000.00     Item Number: 4430

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  • "In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer": First American Edition of Albert Camus’ Classic Novel The Stranger; Inscribed by Him to fellow novelist Vincent Sheean

    CAMUS, Albert.

    The Stranger.

    New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1946.

    First American edition of Camus’ first novel and masterpiece. Octavo, original beige cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the half-title page, “A Vincent Sheean pour le remercier de savoir si bien parler de Stendhal Sympathiquement Albert Camus.” The recipient, Vincent Sheean was an American journalist and novelist. Sheean’s most famous work was Personal History, which won one of the inaugural National Book Awards: the Most Distinguished Biography of 1935. Film producer Walter Wanger acquired the political memoir and made it the basis for his 1940 film production Foreign Correspondent, directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Sheean wrote the narration for the feature-length documentary Crisis (1939) directed by Alexander Hammid and Herbert Kline. He translated Ève Curie’s biography of her mother, Madame Curie (1939), into English. Sheean wrote Oscar Hammerstein I: Life and Exploits of an Impresario (1955) as well as a controversial biography of Dorothy Thompson and Sinclair Lewis, Dorothy and Red (1963). He studied at the University of Chicago, becoming part of a literary circle which included Glenway Wescott, Yvor Winters, Elizabeth Madox Roberts and Janet Lewis while he was there. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Warren Chappell. Translated by Stuart Gilbert. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. Presentation copies of The Stranger are rare, with only one appearing at auction in the past 70 years. Exceedingly scarce and desirable.

    Price: $45,000.00     Item Number: 97850

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  • Contributions to the Theory of Games Volumes I-IV; Signed by John Von Neumann, John Nash, Kenneth Arrow and Others

    VON NEUMANN, John; John F. Nash; Kenneth J. Arrow; Robert J. Aumann; Philip Wolfe; John Milnor; Martin Shubik; W.H. Fleming.

    Contributions To The Theory Of Games Volumes 1-IV.

    Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1950-1959.

    First edition of each work in this ground-breaking four volume work on game theory. Octavo, 4 volumes, original orange wrappers. Volume one is signed by contributors John von Neumann and John Nash on the title page. Contains the article by the Nobel Prize-winning economist entitled, “A Simple Three Person Poker Game.” Volume II is signed by contributors Kenneth J. Arrow and John Milnor. Volume III is signed by contributors W.H. Fleming and Philip Wolfe on the title page. Volume IV is signed by contributors Robert J. Aumann and Martin Shubik. In near fine condition with some rubbing and wear. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. An exceptional set, most rare and desirable signed by von Neumann and other contributors.

    Price: $42,500.00     Item Number: 48080

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  • Large Signed Portrait Photograph Signed by Charles Dickens

    DICKENS, Charles.

    Charles Dickens Signed Portrait Photograph.

    1868.

    Signed “Charles Dickens (with a large flourish) Washington, D.C. Seventh February 1868.” Large oval portrait photograph measures 13 inches by 13 inches. Matted in a walnut frame which measures 24 inches by 27 inches.  On his Washington tour Dickens met President Andrew Johnson and signed this photograph on the date of that meeting, February 7, which also happened to be Dickens’ birthday. He discussed in a letter to his friend and agent John Foster regarding that day, “This scrambling scribblement is resumed this morning, because I have just seen the President: who had sent to me very courteously asking me to make my own appointment. He is a man with a remarkable face.” From the Library of The Cosmos Club in Washington, D.C. Portrait photographs of this size signed by Dickens are exceptionally rare, especially with such noted provenance.

    Price: $42,000.00     Item Number: 5825

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  • “If they can get you asking the wrong questions, they don’t have to worry about answers”: First Edition of Thomas Pynchon's Gravity's Rainbow; Inscribed by Him

    PYNCHON, Thomas.

    Gravity’s Rainbow.

    New York : The Viking Press, 1973.

    First edition of Pynchon’s National Book Award-winning novel. Octavo, original cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper, “To Herb Yellin- Regards, Thomas Pynchon.” The recipient Herb Yellin, was the publisher and founder of Lord John Press, considered by many to be one of the most important small presses of the 20th century. He formed a friendship with the author, Thomas Pynchon. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with some light wear to the extremities and a closed tear to the rear panel. Jacket design by Marc Getter. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. Books signed and inscribed by Pynchon are one of the great rarities of twentieth century literature.

    Price: $42,000.00     Item Number: 7202

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  • Alfred B. Searle's Refractory Materials; inscribed by Nikola Tesla to fellow inventor Bartley E. Broadwell

    SEARLE, Alfred B. [Nikola Tesla].

    Refractory Materials: Their Manufacture and Uses.

    London: Charles Griffin & Company, Limited, 1924.

    Rare second revised and enlarged edition of Alfred B. Searle’s Refectory Materials; inscribed by brilliant inventor Nikola Tesla. Octavo, original cloth, with 174 graphs, diagrams and maps throughout the text. Presentation copy, inscribed by Nikola Tesla on the half-title page, “To B. E. Broadwell, with compliments from, Nikola Tesla, New York, May 18, 1931.” The recipient, Bartley E. Broadwell was engaged as the general superintendent of the Aluminum Company of America and resided in Niagara Falls, New York. He applied for and was granted U.S. patents for several inventions in the early 20th century, including his electrode for electrometallurgical, or “ring” furnaces. Two years before he founded the Nikola Tesla Company in 1896, Tesla was commissioned by Edward Dean Adams, who headed up the Niagara Falls Cataract Construction Company, to consult on how best to use the hydroelectric power generated by the falls. He advised Adams that a two-phased system would be the most reliable and a contract was awarded to General Electric to build the AC distribution system. In the 1930s, when Tesla inscribed the present volume, he was effectively bankrupt. The book was at one time part of his personal library which was slowly dissembled as he struggled to pay rent and resided in a number of hotel rooms. On June 20th 1931, two months after he inscribed the present volume, Tesla was featured on the cover of Time Magazine for his contributions to electrical power generation and in honor of his 75th birthday. In near fine condition. Exceptionally rare.

    Price: $42,000.00     Item Number: 118028

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  • "You only live twice: Once when you're born And once when you look death in the face": First Edition of You Only Live Twice; Inscribed by Ian Fleming to close friend Noël Coward

    FLEMING, Ian.

    You Only Live Twice.

    London: Jonathan Cape, 1965.

    First edition of the final James Bond novel published during Fleming’s lifetime and the eleventh in the series. First state with “First published 1964” on the copyright page. Octavo, original black cloth lettered in gilt, patterned endpapers. Association copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper, “To Celestial Coward-san from Miserable Fleming-san.” The recipient, English playwright, director and actor Noël Coward was a close friend of Fleming’s and his neighbor in Jamaica. Named for the luminous insects seen in the warm evenings, his Firefly Estate east of Oracabessa, Jamaica entertained a wide range of guests, including both the Queen Mother and Queen Elizabeth II, Sir Winston Churchill, Lord Olivier, Sophia Loren, Dame Elizabeth Taylor, Sir Alec Guinness, Peter O’Toole, and Richard Burton. Coward, inspired to build his own Jamaican retreat by a visit to Goldeneye in 1948, was Fleming’s closest friend on the island and it was with his great encouragement that Fleming began writing the Bond novels that made him famous. When Fleming married Ann in 1952, Coward was one of two wedding guests and in the same year he was made godfather to their newborn son Caspar. Known for his likable sophistication and sharp sense of humor, Coward’s songs, plays, and films were immensely popular from the early 1920s through the 60s and 70s when they achieved renewed fame and critical acclaim with a variety of new revues celebrating his music, including Oh, Coward! on Broadway and Cowardy Custard in London. Coward won an Academy Honorary Award in 1943 for his naval film drama ‘In Which We Serve’, was knighted by Queen Elizabeth in 1969, and received a Tony Award for lifetime achievement in 1970. Fleming referenced Coward on page 227 of the present volume when Bond muttered to Blofeld after an explosion, “I’ll admit that your effects man down below knows his stuff. Now bring on the twelve she-devils, and if they’re all as beautiful as Fräulein Bunt, we’ll get Noël Coward to put it to music and have it on Broadway by Christmas. How about it?” With Coward’s bookplate to the pastedown. Fine in a fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Richard Chopping. An exceptional association copy of this particularly uncommon signed and inscribed title as Fleming passed away in the year of publication.

    Price: $40,000.00     Item Number: 111065

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  • “The object of the artist is the creation of the beautiful. What the beautiful is is another question": First English Edition of James Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Inscribed by Him

    JOYCE, James.

    A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.

    London: The Egoist Ltd, 1916.

    First English edition, one of approximately 750 copies of Joyce’s classic stream-of-consciousness work, his first novel. Octavo, original cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper, “To Beatrice Randegger. James Joyce. 25 Novembre 1919. Trieste.” The recipient was a private student’s of Joyce in Italy. In excellent condition with light rubbing and wear. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box.

    Price: $40,000.00     Item Number: 109550

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  • Autographed Signed Letters From Mohandas Gandhi

    GANDHI, Mohandas K. [Mahatma].

    Mohandas K. Gandhi Autograph Note Collection.

    1926.

    Rare autograph note collection in the hand of the Father of the Nation of India, Mahatma Gandhi, written at the height of the struggle for Indian Independence. The collection includes two autograph notes, two autograph letters, and three autograph postcards with Gandhi’s “Blessings” inscribed at the conclusion of each. The postcards are postmarked May 27, June 26, and July 25 1926. Gandhi took leadership of the Indian National Congress in 1921 and led nationwide campaigns to ease poverty, expand women’s rights, and, above all, achieve Indian independence from British rule. In the wake of World War II, Gandhi opposed providing any help to the British war effort and campaigned against any Indian participation in the war. As the war progressed, Gandhi intensified his demand for independence, calling for the British to Quit India in a 1942 speech in Mumbai, hours after which he was arrested by the British government. Gandhi’s imprisonment lasted two years, although he was initially sentenced to six. He was released in May of 1944 due to failing health. Following the end of WWII, the new British government passed the Indian Independence Act of 1947, partitioning the British Indian Empire was into two dominions, a Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan. In very good condition.

    Price: $40,000.00     Item Number: 114068

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  • "The Bible Of Investing"; Graham and Dodd’s Security Analysis; Inscribed by Benjamin Graham

    GRAHAM, Benjamin & David L. Dodd.

    Security Analysis: Principles and Technique.

    New York: Whittlesey House/ McGraw Hill, 1934.

    First edition, second printing of Graham and Dodd’s seminal work, considered the Bible of modern financial analysis. Octavo, original black cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper, “To Melbourne S. Moyer with the best wishes of Benj. Graham Jan 1935.” The recipient, Melbourne Moyer was a contemporary of Graham and a Wall Street trader at Fulton Trust Company of New York. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. Signed examples of Security Analysis are of the utmost rarity.

    Price: $40,000.00     Item Number: 99745

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  • "High School introduced at young age (15 & 16) to Emily Dickinson, who is probably greatest American poet I realize now": Rare Graduate Student Questionnaire Completed and Signed by Jack Kerouac with a lengthy inscription

    KEROUAC, Jack.

    Jack Kerouac Autograph Questionnaire Signed.

    1960.

    Rare mimeographed questionnaire sent by a graduate student of City College of New York to Jack Kerouac; completed and signed twice by him with a lengthy inscription in conclusion. Two pages, partially printed the questionnaire begins with a typed letter signed by James A. Sherlock politely requesting Kerouac’s response which reads in part: “Dear Mr. Kerouac, I am a graduate student of City College of New York, working upon an original research project aimed at uncovering certain educational factors in the lives of successful writers. As you undoubtedly know, there always has been considerable interest in analyzing the psychological make-up of the writer, but seldom has the more prosaic factor of the writer’s education been taken into consideration. Through this questionnaire, I would like to find out if the average successful writer considers his high school education in English a help or a hindrance in preparing him for his profession. Did frequent composition assignments aid the writer in improving his skill? Did reading – either outside reading or reading assigned in the classroom – play a small or large part in preparing the writer for his work?” Completed by Kerouac, in his hand, the questionnaire reads: Reading During High School: 1. In your high school days, did you prefer to read fiction or non-fiction? “Both” 2. If you preferred fiction, what type did you prefer? (Novels, short stories, plays, poetry, etc.) “Novels (from Bronte to ‘pulp’ novels)” 3. If you preferred non-fiction, what subjects did you prefer to read about? “Encyclopaedias [sic], Atlases, Harvard Classics (of Elliot)” 4. Was most of your reading matter of your own choosing or reading material assigned in the classroom? “My Own Choosing mostly (cut classes to spend schooldays in Library)” 5. Did you favor one or two authors at this time in particular in your high school reading? If so, whom? “Just general” 6. As nearly as you can remember, approximately how many books did you read each month during your high school days? “Depended on activities (of course)” High School Instruction: 7. As nearly as you can remember, how often were written compositions assigned in your high school English classes? “Can’t remember” 8. In your opinion, what facet of English instruction did most to develop your skill as a writer? (Literature, composition, spelling, grammar, vocabulary study, others) “Literature” The least? “Composition” 9. As you recall, were your grades in English composition on the whole very good, good, average, fair, or poor? (Kerouac has checked good) 10. Do you recall ever having received special encouragement in your writing from a high school English teacher? “Yes, Joseph Pyne of Lowell High School (Mass.)” Early Writing: 11. At approximately what age did you first seriously consider becoming a writer? “17 (That is, a ‘serious’ writer) (wrote since 11)” 12. Did you engage in outside writing – above the usual writing required in every day life – to any degree at this time? “Yes – from 11 yrs. old on.” 13. Did you at this time consciously imitate the style of any particular author or authors in your writing? “Yes” If so, who? “Saroyan & Hemingway (at 17)” 14. In your opinion, how much did your high school English courses contribute to your success as a writer? (Kerouac has checked all four options: Very much, Some, Little, and Very Little) 15. What factor or factors, if any, would you say contributed more that your schooling to your success as a writer? “SELF IMPOSED READING SCHEDULES OUTSIDE CLASSROOM” Note: If you have additional ideas on the value or inadequacies of your high school English instruction, please feel free to state them on the back of this questionnaire. Name: “Jack Kerouac”. In response to the final question, Kerouac has added a full page signed inscription to the verso of the third page of the questionnaire, “English & American Lit course in High School introduced at young age (15 & 16) to Emily Dickinson, who is probably greatest American poet I realize now (at least equal to Melville & Whitman for sheer mental beauty & brilliance of emotion – description) – High School crucial time to teach Jack K. But writers are born, not made (ask Balzac).” In near fine condition. An exceptional example offering a rare and intimate glimpse into the education and influences of one of the formative writers of the 20th century.

    Price: $38,000.00     Item Number: 117950

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  • First Edition of Pynchon's First Book V.; Inscribed by Him to his Close Friend in the Month of Publication

    PYNCHON, Thomas.

    V.

    Philadelphia and New York: J.B. Lippincott Company, 1963.

    First edition of Pynchon’s first book. Octavo, original cloth. Association copy, inscribed by the author on the verso of the front free endpaper in the month of publication, “Aug. 1963. To Bob & Ginny, with affection, Tom.” The recipient was his Boeing colleague and close friend Bob Hillock and his wife Ginny. Fine in a near fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Ismar David. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. Rare and desirable signed.

    Price: $38,000.00     Item Number: 80035

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  • The Constable Edition of The Works of Shakespeare; one of only 1,000 copies bound by BaynTun in cosway-style binding and elaborately illustrated with original watercolors

    SHAKESPEARE, William. Edited by W. E. Henley.

    The Works of Shakespeare.

    Edinburgh: T. and A. Constable; Grant Richards, 1903-1904.

    The Constable edition of the works of Shakespeare. Folio, ten volumes. Elaborately bound in full blue morocco by Bayntun Riviere in Cosway-style binding with hand painted portrait medallions under glass to the front panel of each volume, gilt titles to the spine, gilt tooling to the spine and front panel, fleuron cornerpiece designs within gilt frames, raised gilt bands, inner dentelles, top edge gilt, silk endleaves, ribbon bound in. Illustrated with 479 tissue-guarded plates and 531 original illustrations, 525 of which are original watercolors. One of only 1,000 copies, this is number 149. Volume X is signed by Grant Richards, who produced that volume only, on the limitation page. Each volume contains four plays, with the exception of volume ten which contains two plays followed by Shakespeare’s narrative poems and sonnets. In near fine condition. Exceptionally rare and desirable. A stunning set.

    Price: $38,000.00     Item Number: 95176

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  • First Edition of Taps At Reveille; Inscribed by F. Scott Fitzgerald To His Secretary

    FITZGERALD, F. Scott.

    Taps at Reveille.

    New York: Charles Scribners Sons, 1935.

    First edition, first state, with pages 349-52 uncancelled and with “catch it” reading on page 351. Octavo, original cloth. Association copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper, “For Isabel Owens Hoping we’ll both be able to look back to this winter as a bleak exception, in a business way from F. Scott (“Old Scrooge”) Fitzgerald.” The recipient, Isabel Owens worked full-time as Fitzgerald’s Baltimore secretary from 1932-36. She continued part-time in this role until his death in 1940. In addition to her secretarial duties, Owens acted as a foster mother to the Fitzgeralds’ daughter Scottie and companion to Zelda. In near fine condition with the spine gilt bright in a very good dust jacket with some inner strengthening to the folds. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. A wonderful association copy.

    Price: $38,000.00     Item Number: 3024

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  • First Edition in English of Albert Camus’ Classic Novel The Stranger; Inscribed by Him

    CAMUS, Albert.

    The Stranger.

    New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1946.

    First American edition of Camus’ first novel and masterpiece. Octavo, original beige cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the half-title page, “A Muriel Sutman nous ne sommes pas des étrangers, Albert Camus.” Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Warren Chappell. Translated by Stuart Gilbert. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. Presentation copies of The Stranger are rare, with only one appearing at auction in the past 70 years.

    Price: $37,500.00     Item Number: 116373

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  • "But man is not made for defeat," he said. "A man can be destroyed but not defeated": First Edition of Ernest Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea; Inscribed by Him

    HEMINGWAY, Ernest.

    The Old Man and the Sea.

    New York: Charles Scribner's & Sons, 1952.

    First edition of Hemingway’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel and one of his most famous works. Octavo, original blue cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper, “To George Ohler with all good wishes, Ernest Hemingway.” Near fine in a near fine dust jacket with light rubbing and wear. Photograph of Hemingway by Lee Samuels. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. Signed first editions of this work are scarce.

    Price: $35,000.00     Item Number: 116295

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  • Complete Set of J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter Deluxe Editions; Each Signed by Her

    ROWLING, J.K.

    Harry Potter Series Complete Deluxe Set. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, Chamber of Secrets, Prisoner of Azkaban, Goblet of Fire, Order of the Phoenix, The Half-Blood Prince, and The Deathly Hallows.

    London: Bloomsbury, 1997-2007.

    First editions of the deluxe edition of each book in Rowling’s Harry Potter series. Octavo, 7 volumes, original decorative cloth as issued. Each volume is signed by J.K. Rowling and were collected in person by the previous owner. The Prisoner of Azkaban is inscribed. In fine condition. No dust jackets were issued for these volumes. Scarce and desirable.

    Price: $35,000.00     Item Number: 81035

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  • “Life's single lesson: that there is more accident to it than a man can ever admit to in a lifetime and stay sane": First Edition of Thomas Pynchon's First Book V.; Inscribed by Him

    PYNCHON, Thomas.

    V.

    Philadelphia and New York: J.B. Lippincott Company, 1963.

    First edition of Pynchon’s first book. Octavo, original cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper, “To Herb Yellin- I’ve been reading this over. It’s not such a terrific book, is it? Thomas Pynchon.” Fine in a near fine dust jacket with some of the usual rubbing to the extremities. Jacket design by Ismar David. Books signed and inscribed by Pynchon are notoriously rare. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box.

    Price: $35,000.00     Item Number: 7203

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  • “And I like large parties. They’re so intimate. At small parties there isn’t any privacy": First Modern Library of The Great Gatsby; Inscribed by F. Scott Fitzgerald

    FITZGERALD, F. Scott.

    The Great Gatsby.

    New York: The Modern Library, 1934.

    First Modern Library edition of the author’s masterpiece, with the first appearance of Fitzgerald’s new introduction. Octavo, original green cloth. Inscribed by the author on the half title page, “For Lillian Abercrombie at the beginning of a tour of work F. Scott Fitzgerald.” Near fine in a very good dust jacket with some rubbing to the extremities and some small chips. Housed in a full custom morocco box. The first Modern Library edition of The Great Gatsby was a resounding commercial failure, and many copies were remaindered with the caption “discontinued title” printed on the jacket’s front panel. The present copy represents one of the earlier, non-remaindered copies, and like all of the first Modern Library editions of The Great Gatsbyfeatures Fitzgerald’s new introduction, with his own, now-famous take on his masterwork: “I think it is an honest book, that is to say, that one used none of one’s virtuosity to get an effect, and, to boast again, one soft-pedalled the emotional side to avoid the tears leaking from the socket of the left eye, or the large false face peering around the corner of a character’s head. If there is a clear conscience, a book can survive — at least in one’s feelings about it. On the contrary, if one has a guilty conscience, one reads what one wants to hear out of reviews. In addition, if one is young and willing to learn, almost all reviews have a value, even the ones that seem unfair.”

    Price: $35,000.00     Item Number: 37020

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  • "unscrew the locks from the doors! Unscrew the doors themselves from their jambs!": Rare Mimeographed Sheets of The Howl Produced for its First Reading. Preceding the First Edition and signed by Ginsberg and five others present at the Six Gallery in October of 1955

    GINSBERG, Allen.

    Howl, for Carl Solomon. Mimeographed for the Six Gallery Reading.

    Two sheets from an exceptionally rare privately produced mimeographed printing of Howl, preceding the first edition. One of 25 copies printed on rectos only in purple ink typed by the poet Robert Creeley and printed by Marthe Rexroth at S.F State, where she was a secretary, for the famous Six Gallery reading (also known as Six Angels in the Same Performance). This event, which took place at 3110 Fillmore Street in San Francisco on October 7, 1955 was the first important public poetry exhibition heralding the West Coast literary revolution of the Beat Generation. At the reading, five talented young poets—Allen Ginsberg, Philip Lamantia, Michael McClure, Gary Snyder, and Philip Whalen presented some of their latest works. They were introduced by Kenneth Rexroth, who was a kind of literary father-figure for the younger poets. It was at this reading that Allen Ginsberg performed the piece in public, which had been advertised by a postcard proclaiming: “Remarkable collection of angels all gathered at once in the same spot. Wine, music, dancing girls, serious poetry, free satori.” The exuberant audience included Neal Cassady, who passed around the wine jug and a collection plate and a drunken Jack Kerouac, who refused to read his own work but cheered the other poets on, and later wrote an account in his novel The Dharma Bums. He fictionalized the event with a description of circulating gallon jugs of California burgundy among the increasingly raucous crowd, “getting them all piffed so that by eleven o’clock when Alvah Goldbrook (Ginsberg’s stand-in in the novel) was reading his wailing poem ‘Wail’ (‘Howl’) drunk with arms outspread everybody was yelling ‘Go! Go! Go!’” Also in attendance was Lawrence Ferlinghetti, who telegrammed Ginsberg the following day offering to publish his work, saying ” I greet you at the beginning of a great career. When do I get the manuscript?” He published in 1956 through his City Lights Press, but customs agents seized Howl and Other Poems when it arrived from its London-based printer on grounds that it was indecent and obscene. Ferlinghetti and his store manager Shigeyoshi Murao were acquitted of the obscenity charges in October 1957. The title page is signed by Allen Ginsberg, with the signature and a note by Marthe Rexroth, which reads, “I cranked the ditto master at S F State the first time around -and! was at the reading.” On the verso of the title, McClure has written the lengthy note, “This first long poem of Allen’s was read at the Six Gallery in San Francisco in October 1955. I was 22 years old and gave my first reading also that night. I read a poem titled FOR THE DEATHS OF 100 WHALES and other poems of nature and new consciousness. Our co-readers that night were Whalen, Snyder, & Lamantia. Kenneth Rexroth was M.C. I met Jack Kerouac that night. The group of us – minus Lamantia – read again in Berkeley, March 1956, on a rainy evening. It was a fine evening for poetry and I remember my pleasure in Allen’s comic ‘America’. I read mostly from a huge notebook of experimental poems of consciousness. Michael McClure.” On the dedication page are the signatures of Philip Lamantia, Gary Snyder, Philip Whalen, Lawrence Ferlinghetti and an inscription by David Meltzer: ” When Allen first read Kaddish in SF, I read too. I was 22.” Double matted and framed, the entire piece measures 20 inches by 26 inches, with an opening in the back of the frame to view McClure’s statement. Only one other similar printing of this edition has surfaced, which fetched $118,750 at auction in 2013, although this copy did include all of the pages. An exceptionally rare item of this important work and cornerstone to American thought and culture.

    Price: $35,000.00     Item Number: 40140

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  • "It Is Very Queer That The Unhappiness Of The World Is So Often Brought On By Small Men": First Edition of All Quiet On The Western Front; Inscribed by Erich Maria Remarque

    REMARQUE, Erich Maria.

    All Quiet On The Western Front.

    London: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1929.

    First edition in English of this landmark novel of the 20th century. Octavo, original cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper, “With the compliments and thans to Geor Henry Gribb! Erich Maria Remarque.” With a type letter from the author dated in 28th February, 1929 from Remarque attached to the front pastedown. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket with light rubbing. With the original publisher’s list and catalogues card laid in. Translated by A.W. Wheen. Exceptionally rare and desirable signed and inscribed, with only one example appearing at auction in the last 90 years.

    Price: $35,000.00     Item Number: 119450

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  • Rare First Edition of Economist’s Joseph Schumpeter’s Classic Work Business Cycles; Inscribed by Him to Fellow Economist Seymour Harris

    SCHUMPETER, Joseph A.

    Business Cycles: A Theoretical, Historical, And Statistical Analysis of the Capitalist Process.

    New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc, 1939.

    First edition of the economist’s ground-breaking work. Octavo, 2 volumes, original cloth. Association copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper of volume one, “To Seymour Harris with kind regards Joseph Schumpeter.” The recipient, Harvard economics professor Seymour Harris, was an editor of the book, Schumpeter as Social Scientist and editor of The New Economics; which Schumpeter was a contributor. In near fine condition with light shelfwear. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. Books signed by Schumpeter are rare.

    Price: $32,500.00     Item Number: 4496

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  • "You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view": First edition of To Kill A Mockingbird; Inscribed by Harper Lee in a Contemporary Hand

    LEE, Harper.

    To Kill a Mockingbird.

    Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company, 1960.

    First edition of Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel which had an initial first printing of 5,000 copies. Octavo, original green cloth backed brown boards, titles to spine in gilt. Presentation copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper in a contemporary hand, “To Liquouri Britain with my best wishes, Nelle Harper Lee.” The recipient was a friend and neighbor of Lee’s who lived Monroeville, Alabama. Near fine in a very good dust jacket with some expert restoration. Jacket design by Shirley Smith. Photograph of Lee on the back panel by Truman Capote. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box.

    Price: $30,000.00     Item Number: 112768

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  • “The starting point of all achievement is DESIRE. Keep this constantly in mind. Weak desire brings weak results, just as a small fire makes a small amount of heat": Rare First Edition of Napoleon Hill's Think and Grow Rich; Signed by Him

    HILL, Napoleon.

    Think and Grow Rich.

    CT: Ralston Society, 1937.

    First edition of this classic bestseller, which has sold over 100 million copies. Octavo, original cloth. Boldly signed by Napoleon Hill on the front free endpaper. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. This is the first example of a first printing we have seen signed. Rare and desirable.

    Price: $30,000.00     Item Number: 89533

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  • "A road map for investing" (Warren Buffett): Rare First Edition Of Graham and Dodd’s Security Analysis; Signed by Buffett

    GRAHAM, Benjamin & David L. Dodd.

    Security Analysis: Principles and Technique.

    New York: Whittlesey House/ McGraw Hill, 1934.

    First edition of Graham and Dodd’s seminal work, considered the Bible of modern financial analysis. Octavo, original red cloth. Boldly signed by Warren Buffett on the front free endpaper, Graham and Dodd’s most well-known adherent. Laid in is a 1993 Berkshire Hathaway Annual Metting Admission Card. “The Superinvestors of Graham-and-Doddsville” is a 1984 article by Warren Buffett promoting value investing, which was based on a speech given on May 17, 1984, at the Columbia University School of Business in honor of the 50th anniversary of the publication of Security Analysis. Using case studies, the speech and article challenged the idea that equity markets are efficient. Buffett brought up 9 investors whom he considered direct protegés of Graham and Dodd, and using their finances, then argued that “these Graham-and-Doddsville investors have successfully exploited gaps between price and value,” despite the inefficiency and “nonsensical” nature of the pricing of the overall market. Buffett concluded in the 1984 article that “some of the more commercially minded among you may wonder why I am writing this article. Adding many converts to the value approach will perforce narrow the spreads between price and value. I can only tell you that the secret has been out for 50 years, ever since Ben Graham and Dave Dodd wrote Security Analysis, yet I have seen no trend toward value investing in the 35 years I’ve practiced it. There seems to be some perverse human characteristic that likes to make easy things difficult. The academic world, if anything, has actually backed away from the teaching of value investing over the last 30 years. It’s likely to continue that way. Ships will sail around the world but the Flat Earth Society will flourish. There will continue to be wide discrepancies between price and value in the marketplace, and those who read their Graham & Dodd will continue to prosper.” In excellent condition with very light rubbing to the cloth. Examples of the first edition are known to exist both in black cloth binding, with “Whittlesey House-McGraw Hill” in gilt at the foot of the spine and in red cloth binding, with “McGraw-Hill Book Company” in gilt at the foot of the spine, as with this example. No priority of issue has been established. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. Rare and desirable signed by Buffett.

    Price: $30,000.00     Item Number: 5070

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  • "Science can only ascertain what is, but not what should be, and outside of its domain value, elly judgments of all kinds remain necessary": First Edition of Albert Einstein’s The Evolution of Physics; Inscribed by Him to Dr. Leonard Rowntree

    EINSTEIN, Albert & Infeld.

    The Evolution of Physics: The Growth of Ideas from Early Concepts to Relativity and Quanta.

    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1938.

    First edition of this classic work, which traces the development of ideas in physics. Octavo, original blue cloth. Association copy, inscribed by Albert Einstein on the front free endpaper, “To Dr. Rowntree with kindest regards A. Einstein 1941.” The recipient, Dr. Leonard Rowntree  is most well known for pioneering kidney research including the Rowntree test for kidney function; dialysis; the intravenous pyelogram and plasmapheresis. He joined Dr. John J. Abel at Johns Hopkins University in 1907, and in 1912 they developed the first artificial kidney, in the form of the dialysis machine. Rowntree would later move to the Mayo Clinic and is widely credited with creating the research tradition there. In 1946, President Harry Truman awarded Rowntree the Medal for Merit for his work as chief of the medical division of the Selective Service System from 1940 to 1945. Near fine in a very good price-clipped dust jacket. An exceptional association.

    Price: $30,000.00     Item Number: 116740

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  • “Words can be like X-rays if you use them properly -- they'll go through anything": First Edition of Aldous Huxley's Brave New World; Signed by Him

    HUXLEY, Aldous.

    Brave New World.

    London: Chatto & Windus, 1932.

    First edition of Huxley’s masterpiece. Octavo, original blue cloth. Boldly signed by the author on the front free endpaper, “Aldous Huxley 1962.” Near fine in a very good dust jacket with some rubbing and wear to the extremities. Signed trade editions of Brave New World are scarce.

    Price: $30,000.00     Item Number: 119848

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  • First Edition of That Hideous Strength; Inscribed by C.S. Lewis to George Orwell

    LEWIS, C.S.

    That Hideous Strength.

    London: John Lane, The Bodley Head, 1943.

    First edition of the final novel in Lewis’ acclaimed Space Trilogy. Octavo, original cloth. Presentation copy, inscribed by C.S. Lewis to fellow writer and journalist George Orwell and his wife (Eric and Eileen Blair) on the front free endpaper, “To the Blairs, with kind regards, C.S. Lewis Aug. 1945.” This is the review copy used in George Orwell’s literary review of the book which was published in the Manchester Evening News on August 16th 1945. Also with three hand-corrections to the text in Lewis’ hand which he made in all review copies before personally sending to critics. Although Lewis and Orwell were not close friends, both were employed as radio journalists by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) during WWII, an era that transformed both religious broadcasting (in which Lewis became a primary figure) and war correspondence (Orwell’s experience as a correspondent working out of the basement of the BBC during wartime was a major inspiration for his masterpiece Nineteen Eighty-Four). Very good in a very good dust jacket. Housed in a custom half morrocco clamshell box. A remarkable association.

    Price: $30,000.00     Item Number: 81218

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  • "With best wishes of a fellow Celt": First Edition of Tender Is the Night; Inscribed by F. Scott Fitzgerald

    FITZGERALD, F. Scott.

    Tender Is The Night. A Romance. Decorations by Edward Shenton.

    New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1934.

    First edition of the work which Fitzgerald considered to be his finest. Octavo, original green cloth. Inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper “For Lillian Abercrombie with best wishes of a fellow Celt F. Scott Fitzgerald.” In near fine condition. Housed in a custom full morocco clamshell and chemise box.

    Price: $30,000.00     Item Number: 87567

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  • "In this brief life of ours, it is sad to do almost anything for the last time": Large Signed Portrait Photograph Signed by Charles Dickens

    DICKENS, Charles.

    Charles Dickens Signed Portrait Photograph.

    1868.

    Large oval portrait photograph measures 20 inches by 16 inches. Matted in a contemporary frame which measures 25.5 inches by 29.5 inches. Signed “Charles Dickens (with a large flourish) Boston Sixth March 1868.” In 1867, Charles Dickens began his second American reading tour at Boston’s Tremont Temple, where an enthusiastic audience delighted in some of his most notable works, members of the audience included legendary literary stars such as Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Ralph Waldo Emerson. Although Dickens was in declining health, he embarked on an ambitious travel schedule across the United States. Dickens returned to Boston once more before concluding his U.S. tour in New York City. When Charles Dickens arrived in Boston on November 19, 1867, the celebrated English author spent several days at the Parker House hotel recuperating from the voyage. As conscientious a performer as he was a writer, Dickens had prepared diligently for his performances, redrafting and memorizing key passages from his books especially for these engagements. He used a book only as a prop; he was so familiar with the material that he could improvise with ease. However, during his 1867-1868 tour he was plagued with Flu-like symptoms, insomnia, and an inflammation of his foot, which forced him to walk with a cane. During his last tours in 1868, Dickens confined much of his performances to the New England area. Dickens was grateful for the income he desperately needed from his readings, which generated $140,000, close to $2,000,000 today; but he longed for home. On April 8, 1868, Dickens gave the last performance of the tour. Prolonged applause followed the reading. He closed by telling the audience, “In this brief life of ours, it is sad to do almost anything for the last time… Ladies and gentlemen, I beg most earnestly, most gratefully, and most affectionately, to bid you, each and all, farewell.” He died two years later, having written 14 novels, several of which are considered classics of English literature. A desirable piece of Victorian literary history.

     

     

    Price: $30,000.00     Item Number: 74030

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  • "to George You're Great And Always will be!": Bob Dylan's Lyrics; Inscribed by Him to George Harrison

    DYLAN, Bob.

    Bob Dylan Lyrics 1962-1985.

    New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1985.

    First printing of the second edition of this compilation of Dylan’s lyrics. Quarto, original glossy illustrated boards. Association copy, inscribed by Dylan to close friend and fellow legendary musician, George Harrison on the front free endpaper: “To George [surrounded by a sun] You’re Great And Always will be! Best wishes Bob Dylan/3/’86.” George Harrison wrote the lyrics to the Beatles hit, “Here Comes the Sun” and Dylan was a major catalyst for Harrison as a musician. They met in person for the first time in August of 1964 at the Delmonico Hotel in New York City, where Dylan, after misinterpreting ‘It’s A Hard Day’s Night’ lyric “I get high”, offered Harrison and his fellow Beatles their first marijuana joint. After this meeting, the friendship between the Beatles and Dylan grew and his influence allowed them to expand past the conventions of pop music, with an increased use of acoustic rather than electric instruments in their recordings and more of a focus on craftsmanship vs. music for the mass market. In the fall of 1968, Harrison came to Dylan’s home in upstate New York, where they co-wrote the song, “I’d Have you Anytime”, which is recognized as a statement of friendship between the two musicians. The song was released on Harrison’s first solo album, “All Things Must Pass”, which also included a song about Dylan called, “Behind That Locked Door” and a cover of Dylan’s song, “If Not For You”.  The two musicians continued occasional jam sessions in private and onstage, but the closeness of their connection was not as apparent to the public until the formation of the Travelling Wilburys in 1988, which consisted of Dylan, Harrison, Jeff Lynne, Roy Orbison and Tom Petty. In near fine condition. A wonderful association copy linking these two music geniuses.

     

    Price: $30,000.00     Item Number: 80146

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  • "And he no longer cared to tell which were things done and which dreamt": First Edition of Cormac McCarthy’s First Book The Orchard Keeper; Inscribed by Him To Close Friend John Sheddan

    MCCARTHY, Cormac.

    The Orchard Keeper.

    New York: Random House, 1965.

    First edition of McCarthy’s first book. Octavo, original half cloth. Association copy, inscribed by the author in a contemporary hand on the front free endpaper, “To John Sheddan Cormac McCarthy.” The recipient, John Sheddan was a close friend of McCarthy’s. “Some of McCarthy’s friends claim that the character Gene Harrogate (a character in McCarthy’s novel, Suttree), or at least his watermelon venture, was based in some way on John Sheddan, “scholar, schemer, hustler, melon paramour” (Gibson 23)… However in a letter of response to Gibson’s article, Knoxvillian Buzz Kelley writes that Sheddan was “probably McCarthy’s best and most loyal friend from the Knoxville crowd,” holder of two master’s degrees, and not at all “a violator of vegetables nor one to fornicate with fruits” (Dianne C. Luce, Reading the World: Cormac McCarthy’s Tennessee Period). Near fine in a near fine price-clipped dust jacket. Jacket design by Muriel Nasser. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. An excellent association.

    Price: $30,000.00     Item Number: 55048

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  • "However closely we live together, at whatever time of day or night we sound the deepest thoughts in one another, we know nothing": Rare First Edition of the John Le Carre’s First Book; Signed by Him

    LE CARRE, John.

    Call For The Dead.

    London: Victor Gollancz, 1961.

    First edition of the author’s first book, which introduced the world to the recurring protagonist, George Smiley. Octavo, original red cloth. Signed by John le Carre on the title page. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. Housed in a custom full morocco clamshell box. An exceptional example.

    Price: $30,000.00     Item Number: 99270

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  • "Life's under no obligation to give us what we expect": First Edition of Gone with the Wind; Inscribed by Her to Her College Roommate

    MITCHELL, Margaret.

    Gone With the Wind.

    New York: The Macmillan Company, 1936.

    First edition, first issue with “Published May 1936” on the copyright page of the author’s classic novel. Octavo, original gray cloth. Association copy, inscribed by the author on the title page in the year of publication, “To Virginia Morris, my room mate at Smith College, my friend for many years With love Peggy Margaret Mitchell Atlanta, GA Dec. 14, 1936.” Mitchell and Morris lodged together at 10 Henshaw Avenue, a college approved boardinghouse, where Mitchell was one of its most vibrant and engaging tenants. During her tenure there, Mitchell was already offering colorful discourses on the Civil War, its conflicts seeming to possess her more than “the current unpleasantness in Europe.” After finishing her freshman year at Smith, and following the death of her mother, Mitchell went back to Atlanta to take over the household for her father and never returned to Smith College. Black and white photograph of the members of Mitchell’s freshmen class at Smith College, with “Peg” kneeling in foreground and two Confederate bills. Owner’s name to the half-title page, near fine in a very good first issue dust jacket, with Gone with the Wind listed in the second column of the booklist on the back panel, with $3.00 cost on the front flap, which shows considerable wear. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. A significant association copy.

    Price: $28,500.00     Item Number: 82010

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  • "The Greatest Story Ever Told": First Edition of The Double Helix; Signed by James Watson, Francis Crick, and Maurice Wilkins

    WATSON, James D.; (Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins).

    The Double Helix: A Personal Account of the Discovery of the Structure of DNA.

    New York: Atheneum, 1968.

    First edition of Watson’s ground breaking work regarding the discovery of DNA for which the author, Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins were awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1962. Signed by all three laureates on the title page, James D. Watson, Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins. Octavo, original blue cloth, with numerous diagrams and photographic illustrations. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Jeanyee Wong. Foreword by Sir Lawrence Bragg. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. We have never seen another example signed by all three contributors; exceptionally rare.

    Price: $28,500.00     Item Number: 96790

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  • “Solitude produces originality, bold & astonishing beauty, poetry": First Edition of Thomas Mann's Der Tod in Venedig; Inscribed by him to close friend and confidant Ernst Bertram

    MANN, Thomas.

    Der Tod in Venidig (Death in Venice).

    Berlin: S. Fischer, Verlag, 1913.

    First trade edition of one of the greatest novellas of the twentieth century. Octavo, original publisher’s quarter vellum over marbled boards. Association copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper, “An Ernst Bertram in herzlicher Wertschatzung Thomas Mann” (To Ernst Bertram in heartfelt appreciation Thomas Mann). One of the best possible association copies, as Bertram was Mann’s closest friend from the late 1900s through the 1930s, when their politics separated them. Bertram was deeply influential on Mann’s thinking and literary direction during the time when he was somewhat artistically lost and suffered his own writer’s block. It was also in nearly daily conversation with Bertram that the long political confessional, Betrachtungen eines Unpolitischen (Reflections of an Unpolitical Man) was born. Bertram was a constant visitor at the Mann’s, and it is evident that there was some quotient of homoerotic attraction to the relationship. It is well-known that Mann’s early adulthood, prior to his marriage to Katia in 1905, were spent in more or less explicitly gay attractions and relations, but recent scholarship has begun to trace the residues of Mann’s homosexuality in his later life and work, and the relationship with Bertram (who was openly homosexual) somehow epitomizes the special significance that the company of men still bore. In addition to being Mann’s closest confidant, Bertram was an important man of letters in his own right. He was a poet, professor at the University of Colon, and author of many books, including Nietzsche – An Attempt of a Mythology. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. Inscribed first editions of Mann’s major works are rare; an association copy to this fellow Nietzschean scholar and close confidant makes this a magnificent piece of history.

     

    Price: $28,000.00     Item Number: 98970

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  • Scarce Presentation copy of the Symposium on The Dynamics of Crystal Lattices; inscribed by Sir Chandrashekhara Venkata Raman to Raja Shamraj Rajwant Bahadur who assembled India’s greatest library

    RAMAN, Sir Chandrashekhara Venkata.

    Symposium on The Dynamics of Crystal Lattices.

    Bangalore: Reprinted from Proceedings of The Indian Academy of Sciences, 1943.

    Rare compendium of papers by Sir Chandrashekhara Raman, winner of the 1930 Nobel Prize in Physics. Quarto, bound in full leatherette with titles lettered in gilt, illustrated with charts and photographs. Presentation copy, inscribed by Chandrashekhara Venkata Raman to Raja Shamraj Rajwant Bahadur, “To Raja Shamraj Rajwant Bahadur with the highest regards of C.V. Raman 3.5.1946.” The recipient, Indian nobleman Raja Shamraj Rajwant Bahadur assembled India’s greatest library, famed for its diverse collection of rare antiquarian manuscripts and important books. With the Raja’s ownership signature and inscription which notes that the book was received from Sir C.V. Raman by registered book post on 6.5.1946, but Sir Raman paid a personal visit in 4-4-46 from 3:30pm- 5:30pm. In very good condition. Laid in is a collection of clippings related to The Raman Research Institute and a Brief Biographical Sketch produced by The Bangalore Press. Scarce with only one other book signed by Raman recorded.

    Price: $28,000.00     Item Number: 108563

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  • “They were so close to each other that they preferred death to separation”: Rare First Edition in Spanish of the Author’s Masterpiece Cien Anos de Soledad; Inscribed by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

    GARCIA MARQUEZ, Gabriel.

    Cien Anos de Soledad [One Hundred Years of Solitude].

    Buenos Aires: Editorial Sudamericana, 1967.

    First edition of the author’s masterpiece which is recognized as one of the most significant works in the Spanish literary canon. Octavo, original illustrated wrappers. Presentation copy, inscribed and dated by the author on the dedication page, “Para Leonard, con todo el afecto, Gabo.” In near fine condition with light rubbing. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. An exceptional example, rare and desirable signed.

    Price: $28,000.00     Item Number: 114832

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  • "However closely we live together, at whatever time of day or night we sound the deepest thoughts in one another, we know nothing": Rare First Edition of the John Le Carre’s First Book; Signed by Him

    LE CARRE, John.

    Call For The Dead.

    London: Victor Gollancz, 1961.

    First edition of the author’s first book, which introduced the world to the recurring protagonist, George Smiley. Octavo, original red cloth. Signed by the author on the title page in a contemporary hand, “John le Carre David Cornwell.” Fine in a near fine price-clipped dust jacket. Housed in a custom clamshell box. An exceptional example, most rare and desirable using his real name and his pen name.

    Price: $28,000.00     Item Number: 94755

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  • First Edition of Ernest Hemingway's The Torrents of Spring; Inscribed by Him to his Nephews

    HEMINGWAY, Ernest.

    The Torrents of Spring.

    New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1926.

    First edition of Hemingway’s first novel, one of 1250 printed. Octavo, original cloth. Association copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper to his nephews, “To Cliff and Dudley, with much affection, Ernest.” The recipients were Clifford and Dudley Bragdon, the nephews of Hadley Richardson, Hemingway’s first wife. Near fine in a very good dust jacket with some of the usual wear to the extremities. With the signature of the recipient, “Clifford R. Bragdon Paris 1927.” Housed in a custom clamshell and chemise case. Association copies of Hemingway’s first novel seldom appear in the marketplace.

    Price: $28,000.00     Item Number: 99358

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  • "It’s just that I’d rather die of drink than of thirst": First edition of Ian Fleming's Thunderball; Inscribed by Fleming to OSS and CIA Agent Charles Jackson

    FLEMING, Ian.

    Thunderball.

    London: Jonathan Cape, 1961.

    First edition of the ninth novel in Ian Fleming’s James Bond series. Octavo, original black cloth. Association copy, inscribed by the author on the front free endpaper, “To C.D. Jackson who says nice things! from Ian Fleming.” The recipient Charles Douglas Jackson joined the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) in 1943 and the following year he was appointed Deputy Chief at the Psychological Warfare Division at Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (SHAEF), and it was during this time Fleming, working for Britain’s Naval Intelligence Division, likely would have met Jackson. After the war, Jackson worked for Life Magazine, and at the time of Thunderball‘s publication, had become the magazine’s publisher. Several years after Jackson’s death in 1964 it was revealed that he had been a CIA agent since 1948. An exceptional association of two important figures in the British/American nexus of World War II and Cold War intelligence operatives given its fullest embodiment in the popular imagination through Fleming’s enduring spy avatar James Bond. Gilbert A9a (1.1). Fine in a near fine dust jacket with a touch of shelfwear. Jacket art by Richard Chopping. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box.

    Price: $28,000.00     Item Number: 100002

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  • First Edition of The Call of the Wild; Inscribed by Jack London to fellow writer and screenplay pioneer Elinor Glyn

    LONDON, Jack.

    The Call of the Wild.

    New York: The Macmillan Company, 1903.

    First edition of one of the most desirable classics in American literature. Octavo, original pictorial green cloth, pictorial endpapers, top edge gilt.  With 18 full-page color illustrations by Philip R. Goodwin and Charles Livingston Bull.  Association copy, inscribed by the author on the half-title page, “To Elinor Glyn:- My most popular, but my own heart goes out to some of my sociological screeds. Jack London Mar. 1, 1911.” The recipient Elinor Glyn was a British novelist and scriptwriter who specialized in romantic fiction, which was considered scandalous for its time. Her first book, The Visits of Elizabeth was published the same year as London’s first book. She later moved to California and became one of the first female writers of movie screenplays. She popularized the concept of the It-girl, and had tremendous influence on early 20th-century popular culture and, possibly, on the careers of notable Hollywood stars such as Rudolph Valentino, Gloria Swanson and, especially, Clara Bow. In near fine condition with light shelfwear. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. Signed first editions of this classic title are scarce.

    Price: $27,500.00     Item Number: 110942

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  • First edition of To Kill A Mockingbird; Signed by Harper Lee

    LEE, Harper.

    To Kill a Mockingbird.

    Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company, 1960.

    First edition of Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel which had an initial first printing of 5,000 copies. Octavo, original green cloth backed brown boards, titles to spine in gilt. Boldly signed by Harper Lee on the front free endpaper. Near fine in a very good dust jacket without any restoration. Jacket design by Shirley Smith. Photograph of Lee on the back panel by Truman Capote. Housed in a custom half morocco clamshell box. Rare and desirable signed.

    Price: $27,500.00     Item Number: 112288

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